Archaeology, Sexism, and Scandal

Archaeology, Sexism, and Scandal

Author: Alan Kaiser

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442230040

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 266

The 1931 excavation season at Olynthus, Greece, ushered a sea change in how archaeologists study material culture—and was the nexus of one of the most egregious (and underreported) cases of plagiarism in the history of classical archaeology. Alan Kaiser draws on the private scrapbook that budding archaeologist Mary Ross Ellingson compiled during that dig, as well as her personal correspondence and materials from major university archives, to paint a fascinating picture of gender, power, and archaeology in the early twentieth century. Using Ellingson’s photographs and letters as a guide, Kaiser brings alive the excavations led by David Robinson and recounts how the unearthing of private homes—rather than public spaces—emerged as a means to examine the day-to-day of ancient life in Greece. But as Archaeology, Sexism, and Scandal clearly demonstrates, a darker story lurks beneath the smiling faces and humorous tales: one where Robinson stole Ellingson’s words and insights for his own, and where fellow academics were complicit in the theft.

The Arecibo Antenna

The Arecibo Antenna

Author: Helias Doundoulakis

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 9781669810414

Category: Education

Page: 584

View: 120

The Arecibo Radio Telescope (Arecibo) has made amazing findings that would otherwise have remained undiscovered. Yet, Arecibo’s inception is shrouded in mystery: unknown is the true story behind its creation, secret for all these years. Until now. In his final book, Helias Doundoulakis demystifies Arecibo for the novice, from dreams to drawings. The chronological account of the iconic telescope is made plain for all to see, which spanned six decades. Read how his brother, George Doundoulakis, undertook its conception and fielding, finally winning patent rights for his brother Helias, CIA director William Casey, and Gus Michalos. Follow the inseparable brothers on their journey of courage, inspiration, and brilliance that advanced the design of Arecibo and inspired generations of space scientists for years to come.

Twentieth Century Music Writers - A Hyperlist

Twentieth Century Music Writers - A Hyperlist

Author: Neil E. Clement

Publisher: MTCC Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780998631172

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 626

View: 267

How many composers, songwriters and lyricists wrote music in the twentieth century?? Who were they?? This first edition identifies more than 14,000 people who did so, and all are listed in this eBook alphabetically along with a hyperlink to their Wikipedia biographical data. Performers of blues, folk, jazz, rock & roll and R&B are included by default. PLEASE NOTE: THE HYPERLINKS IN THIS BOOK ONLY FUNCTION ON GOOGLE PLAY aka THE 'FLOWING' VERSION. The hyperlinks in this book DO NOT CURRENTLY FUNCTION on the GOOGLE BOOKS ' FIXED' version.

Carl W. Blegen

Carl W. Blegen

Author: Jack L. Davis

Publisher: ISD LLC

ISBN: 9781937040246

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 252

View: 507

Carl Blegen is the most famous American archaeologist ever to work in Greece, and no American has ever had a greater impact on Greek archaeology. Yet Blegen, unlike several others of his generation, has found no biographer. In part, the explanation for this must lie in the fact that his life was so multifaceted: not only was he instrumental in creating the field of Aegean prehistory, but Blegen, his wife, and their best friends, the Hills ("the family"), were also significant forces in the social and intellectual community of Athens. Authors who have contributed to this book have each researched one aspect of Blegen's life, drawing on copious documentation in the United States, England, and Greece. The result is a biography that sets Blegen and his closest colleagues in the social and academic milieu that gave rise to the discipline of classical archaeology in Greece.

Considering Anthropology and Small Wars

Considering Anthropology and Small Wars

Author: Montgomery Mcfate

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000225280

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 728

This book includes a variety of chapters that consider the role and importance of anthropology in small wars and insurgencies. Almost every war since the origins of the discipline at the beginning of the 19th century has involved anthropology and anthropologists. The chapters in this book fall into the following myriad categories of military anthropology. Anthropology for the military. In some cases, anthropologists participated directly as uniformed combatants, having the purpose of directly providing expert knowledge with the goal of improving operations and strategy. Anthropology of the military. Anthropologists have also been known to study State militaries. Sometimes this scholarship is undertaken with the objective of providing the military with information about its own internal systems and processes in order to improve its performance. At other times, the objective is to study the military as a human group to identify and describe its culture and social processes. Anthropology of war. As a discipline, anthropology has also had a long history of studying warfare itself. This book considers the anthropology of small wars and insurgencies through an analysis of the Islamic State’s military adaptation in Iraq, Al Shabaab recruiting in Somalia, religion in Israeli combat units, as well as many other topics. The chapters in this book were originally published as a special issue of the journal, Small Wars & Insurgencies.

Red America

Red America

Author: Kostis Karpozilos

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781800738560

Category: History

Page: 211

View: 324

Historians of immigration and ethnicity in the United States have typically devoted little attention to Greek Americans compared to the extensive historical literature produced about their Irish, Italian, and German counterparts. From acclaimed historian Kostis Karpozilos, Red America provides a deeply researched correction to Western perspectives on Greek American interaction with social, political, and economic change. Focusing on the history of the Greek American Left from the beginning of the twentieth century to the Cold War, this volume uncovers the threads that bound notions of radical social change to the everyday experiences of immigrants, tracing ethnic radicalism from the boundaries of a specific community to the epicenter of American social and political history.

Western Ways

Western Ways

Author: Frederick Whitling

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110602531

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 788

In Western Ways, for the first time, the "foreign schools" in Rome and Athens, institutions dealing primarily with classical archaeology and art history, are discussed in historical terms as vehicles and figureheads of national scholarship. By emphasising the agency and role of individuals in relation to structures and tradition, the book shows how much may be gained by examining science and politics as two sides of the same coin. It sheds light on the scholarly organisation of foreign schools, and through them, on the organisation of classical archaeology and classical studies around the Mediterranean. With its breadth and depth of archival resources, Western Ways offers new perspectives on funding, national prestige and international collaboration in the world of scholarship, and places the foreign schools in a framework of nineteenth and twentieth century Italian and Greek history.

Contested Antiquity

Contested Antiquity

Author: Esther Solomon

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253056009

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 918

While the archaeological legacies of Greece and Cyprus are often considered to represent some of the highest values of Western civilization—democracy, progress, aesthetic harmony, and rationalism—this much adored and heavily touristed heritage can quickly become the stage for clashes over identity and memory. In Contested Antiquity, Esther Solomon curates explorations of how those who safeguard cultural heritage are confronted with the best ways to represent this heritage responsibly. How should visitors be introduced to an ancient Byzantine fortification that still holds the grim reminders of the cruel prison it was used as until the 1980s? How can foreign archaeological institutes engage with another nation's heritage in a meaningful way? What role do locals have in determining what is sacred, and can this sense of the sacred extend beyond buildings to the surrounding land? Together, the essays featured in Contested Antiquity offer fresh insights into the ways ancient heritage is negotiated for modern times.

Excavating Indiana Jones

Excavating Indiana Jones

Author: Randy Laist

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476676920

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 219

View: 405

With his signature bullwhip and fedora, the rousing sounds of his orchestral anthem, and his eventful explorations into the arcana of world religions, Indiana Jones--archeologist, adventurer, and ophidiophobe--has become one of the most recognizable heroes of the big screen. Since his debut in the 1981 film Raiders of the Lost Ark, Indiana Jones has gone on to anchor several sequels, and a fifth film is currently in development. At the same time, the character has spilled out into multiple multimedia manifestations and has become a familiar icon within the collective cultural imagination. Despite the longevity and popularity of the Indiana Jones franchise, however, it has rarely been the focus of sustained criticism. In Excavating Indiana Jones, a collection of international scholars analyzes Indiana Jones tales from a variety of perspectives, examining the films' representation of history, cultural politics, and identity, and also tracing the adaptation of the franchise into comic books, video games, and theme park attractions.