Enhancing Food Safety

Enhancing Food Safety

Author: National Research Council

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 0309163587

Category: Medical

Page: 588

View: 744

Recent outbreaks of illnesses traced to contaminated sprouts and lettuce illustrate the holes that exist in the system for monitoring problems and preventing foodborne diseases. Although it is not solely responsible for ensuring the safety of the nation's food supply, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees monitoring and intervention for 80 percent of the food supply. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's abilities to discover potential threats to food safety and prevent outbreaks of foodborne illness are hampered by impediments to efficient use of its limited resources and a piecemeal approach to gathering and using information on risks. Enhancing Food Safety: The Role of the Food and Drug Administration, a new book from the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council, responds to a congressional request for recommendations on how to close gaps in FDA's food safety systems. Enhancing Food Safety begins with a brief review of the Food Protection Plan (FPP), FDA's food safety philosophy developed in 2007. The lack of sufficient detail and specific strategies in the FPP renders it ineffectual. The book stresses the need for FPP to evolve and be supported by the type of strategic planning described in these pages. It also explores the development and implementation of a stronger, more effective food safety system built on a risk-based approach to food safety management. Conclusions and recommendations include adopting a risk-based decision-making approach to food safety; creating a data surveillance and research infrastructure; integrating federal, state, and local government food safety programs; enhancing efficiency of inspections; and more. Although food safety is the responsibility of everyone, from producers to consumers, the FDA and other regulatory agencies have an essential role. In many instances, the FDA must carry out this responsibility against a backdrop of multiple stakeholder interests, inadequate resources, and competing priorities. Of interest to the food production industry, consumer advocacy groups, health care professionals, and others, Enhancing Food Safety provides the FDA and Congress with a course of action that will enable the agency to become more efficient and effective in carrying out its food safety mission in a rapidly changing world.

Food Safety

Food Safety

Author: Juliana Burkhart

Publisher: Greenhaven Publishing LLC

ISBN: 9781534568822

Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

Page: 104

View: 215

The average consumer often ignores the conditions their food is grown or raised in. Generally, it is only when a deadly outbreak of foodborne illness occurs that people scrutinize the food industry and food safety regulations. Illuminating text, augmented with informative charts and detailed fact boxes, provides a comprehensive guide to the history of food safety laws in the United States. Readers learn about major foodborne diseases and what causes them, as well as what is being done to stop those diseases from spreading. Annotated quotes from experts and full-color photographs enhance this essential reading experience.

Food Safety Management

Food Safety Management

Author: Hal King

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461462057

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 130

View: 368

The goal of this book is to show how to build and manage a food safety department that is tasked with ensuring food safety within a food retail business. The experiences of the author as the head of Food and Product Safety at Chick-fil-A will be used as the model. Specifically, the book will discuss the specific components of a food safety program, the tactics needed to establish these components (forming the majority of the chapters), how to measure the success of each component, and how to influence the organization to ensure resources to support the program. The book will also focus on how to choose and work with the appropriate partners, validate the value to the business, and initiate the new component throughout the organization, including how to sustain the component within the program. Five features of this book that make it distinctive are: Most current “How to” book on leading a food safety department from the perspective of a respected national brand Provides the proper organization and methods to manage the work necessary to ensure food safety within the organization Provides the means to utilize risk-based decisions linked to business practices that accommodate a business analysis model Demonstrates step-by-step examples that can be used for continuous improvement in sustaining food safety responsibilities Provides examples on how to gain influence and obtain resources to support food safety responsibilities

Food safety

Food safety

Author: Lisa Shames

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN: 9781437934045

Category:

Page: 25

View: 513

The U.S. faces challenges to ensuring food safety. First, imported food makes up a substantial and growing portion of the U.S. food supply, with 60% of fresh fruits and vegetables and 80% of seafood coming from across our borders. In recent years, there has been an increase in reported outbreaks of foodborne illness associated with both domestic and imported produce. This report focuses primarily on the FDAs: (1) progress in addressing selected recommend. identified by the FDA Science Board; (2) incorp. of scientific and risk analysis into its oversight of the accuracy of food labeling, fresh produce, and the safety of dietary supplements; and (3) a new computer screening tool that may improve its efforts to screen imports using a risk-based approach.

Advances in Microbial Food Safety

Advances in Microbial Food Safety

Author: J Sofos

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 9780857098740

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 560

View: 656

New research, outbreaks of foodborne disease and changes to legislation mean that food microbiology research is constantly evolving. Advances in microbial food safety: Volume 1 summarises the key trends in this area for the food industry. The book begins with an introductory chapter discussing food safety management systems from the past to the present day and looking to future directions. The book moves on to provide updates on specific pathogens including Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus species. New developments in the area are explored with chapters on emerging parasites in food, advances in separation and concentration of microorganisms from food samples, new approaches in microbial pathogen detection, and an update on novel methods for pathogen control in livestock preharvest. With its distinguished editor and international team of expert contributors, Advances in microbial food safety: Volume 1 is a standard reference for researchers, consultants and managers in the food industry responsible for food safety, analytical laboratories testing the safety of the food we eat, and researchers in academia working on food microbial safety. Summarises new research, outbreaks of foodborne disease and changes to legislation in food microbiology research Examines past, present and future food safety management systems Provides updates on specific pathogens including Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus species

Integrated Food Safety and Veterinary Public Health

Integrated Food Safety and Veterinary Public Health

Author: Sava Buncic

Publisher: CABI

ISBN: 9781845930837

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 386

View: 617

The importance of food safety for human health has been widely recognized. The safety of foods of animal origin is particularly relevant because the large majority of foodborne diseases come from poultry, eggs, meat, milk and dairy products and fish. This textbook covers an integrated approach to this type of food production, hygiene and safety and shows how it results in concurrent benefits to animal well being, human health, protection of the environment and socioeconomics.

Food Safety, Risk Intelligence and Benchmarking

Food Safety, Risk Intelligence and Benchmarking

Author: Sylvain Charlebois

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781119071099

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 232

View: 699

This book comprehensively argues for more future benchmarking between nations. Since the initial food safety benchmarking report was published in 2008, the sharing of data and protocols among nations has dramatically increased. It was intended to identify and evaluate common elements among global food safety systems. More specifically, benchmarking identifies those countries that employ comparatively best practices to assess, manage, and communicate the risks related to the safety of food and their respective food systems. The overarching intent of this benchmarking assessment, however, is to stimulate exchange and discussion on food safety performance among nations.

Microbiological Testing in Food Safety Management

Microbiological Testing in Food Safety Management

Author: International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods Staff

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781468483697

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 362

View: 366

2. 11 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 CHAPTER 3-MEETING THE FSO THROUGH CONTROL MEASURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 3. 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 3. 2 Control Measures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 3. 3 Confirm That the FSO Is Technically Achievable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 3. 4 Importance of Control Measures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 3. 5 Performance Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 3. 6 Process and Product Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 3. 7 The Use of Microbiological Sampling and Performance Criteria . . . . . . . . . 59 3. 8 Default Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 3. 9 Process Validation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 3. 10 Monitoring and Verifying Control Measures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 3. 11 Examples of Control Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 3. 12 Assessing Equivalency of Food Safety Management Systems . . . . . . . . . . . 68 3. 13 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Appendix 3-A: Control Measures Commonly Applied to Foodborne Diseases . . 71 CHAPTER 4-SELECTION AND USE OF ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 4. 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 4. 2 Equivalence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 4. 3 Establishment of Acceptance Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 4. 4 Application of Acceptance Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 4. 5 Determining Acceptance by Approval of Supplier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 4. 6 Examples To Demonstrate the Process of Lot Acceptance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 4. 7 Auditing Food Operations for Supplier Acceptance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 4. 8 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 CHAPTER 5-ESTABLISHMENT OF MICROBIOLOGICAL CRITERIA FOR LOT ACCEPTANCE . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . 99 5. 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 5. 2 Purposes and Application of Microbiological Criteria for Foods . . . . . . . . . 10 1 5. 3 Definition of Microbiological Criterion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1 5. 4 Types of Microbiological Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 5. 5 Application of Microbiological Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 5. 6 Principles for the Establishment of Microbiological Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 5. 7 Components of Microbiological Criteria for Foods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 5. 8 Examples of Microbiological Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Food Safety for Farmers Markets: A Guide to Enhancing Safety of Local Foods

Food Safety for Farmers Markets: A Guide to Enhancing Safety of Local Foods

Author: Judy A. Harrison

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319666891

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 170

View: 131

This book describes practices used on farms and in farmers markets selling foods directly to consumers in U.S. and international markets. It identifies hazards associated with those practices that could put consumers at increased risk for foodborne illness. It also provides tools for identifying hazards on farms and in markets and guidance for establishing food-safe markets. The local food movement, inspired by initiatives such as the USDA’s “Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food”; “Farm to School”; “Farm to Pre-school”; and “The People’s Garden”, is sweeping the country. Nowhere is this interest more evident than at farmers markets. The number of farmers markets has increased almost 400% since the early 1990s, with over 8,600 farmers markets listed in the USDA’s market directory in 2016. Many of the customers for local markets are senior adults, people who may have health concerns, and mothers with young children shopping for foods they perceive to be healthier and safer than those available in grocery stores. This means that many of the customers may be in population groups that are most at risk for foodborne illness and the serious complications that can result. In surveys, however, farmers selling directly to consumers self-reported practices that could increase risk for foodborne illnesses. These included use of raw manure as fertilizer without appropriate waiting periods between application and harvest, as outlined in the National Organic Program, a lack of sanitation training for farm workers handling produce, a lack of proper cleaning and sanitizing of surfaces that come in contact with produce, and use of untested surface water for rinsing produce before taking it to market. Surveys of market managers found that many had limited experience and most had no food safety plans for their markets. Observational studies in markets have corroborated self-reported practices that could increase foodborne illness risks, including lack of handwashing, lack of access to well-maintained toilet and handwashing facilities, use of materials that cannot be cleaned and sanitized appropriately, and lack of temperature control for foods that must have time and temperature controlled for safety. These potential food safety risks are not only seen in U.S. farmers markets, but also have been identified in international markets. This book is unique in that it provides evidence-based information about food safety hazards and potential risks associated with farmers markets. It presents an overview of farm and market practices and offers guidance for enhancing food safety on farms and in markets for educators, farmers, producers, vendors and market managers. Dr. Judy A. Harrison is a Professor in the Department of Foods and Nutrition at the University of Georgia (UGA) where she has been named a Walter Bernard Hill Fellow for distinguished achievement in public service and outreach. Serving as a food safety specialist for UGA Cooperative Extension, she has provided 25 years of food safety education for a variety of audiences across the food system.