Galileo Goes to Jail and Other Myths about Science and Religion

Galileo Goes to Jail and Other Myths about Science and Religion

Author: Ronald L. Numbers

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674057418

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 368

If we want nonscientists and opinion-makers in the press, the lab, and the pulpit to take a fresh look at the relationship between science and religion, Ronald L. Numbers suggests that we must first dispense with the hoary myths that have masqueraded too long as historical truths. Until about the 1970s, the dominant narrative in the history of science had long been that of science triumphant, and science at war with religion. But a new generation of historians both of science and of the church began to examine episodes in the history of science and religion through the values and knowledge of the actors themselves. Now Ronald Numbers has recruited the leading scholars in this new history of science to puncture the myths, from Galileo’s incarceration to Darwin’s deathbed conversion to Einstein’s belief in a personal God who “didn’t play dice with the universe.” The picture of science and religion at each other’s throats persists in mainstream media and scholarly journals, but each chapter in Galileo Goes to Jail shows how much we have to gain by seeing beyond the myths.

Newton’s Apple and Other Myths about Science

Newton’s Apple and Other Myths about Science

Author: Ronald L. Numbers

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674915473

Category: Science

Page: 208

View: 719

A falling apple inspired the law of gravity—or so the story goes. Is it true? Perhaps not. But why do such stories endure as explanations of how science happens? Newton’s Apple and Other Myths about Science brushes away popular misconceptions to provide a clearer picture of scientific breakthroughs from ancient times to the present.

Understanding Evolution

Understanding Evolution

Author: Kostas Kampourakis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107034914

Category: Science

Page: 270

View: 692

Bringing together conceptual obstacles and core concepts of evolutionary theory, this book presents evolution as straightforward and intuitive.

Scientism: The New Orthodoxy

Scientism: The New Orthodoxy

Author: Richard N. Williams

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472571113

Category: Philosophy

Page: 224

View: 926

Scientism: The New Orthodoxy is a comprehensive philosophical overview of the question of scientism, discussing the role and place of science in the humanities, religion, and the social sciences. Clarifying and defining the key terms in play in discussions of scientism, this collection identifies the dimensions that differentiate science from scientism. Leading scholars appraise the means available to science, covering the impact of the neurosciences and the new challenges it presents for the law and the self. Illustrating the effect of scientism on the social sciences, and the humanities, Scientism: the New Orthodoxy addresses what science is and what it is not. This provocative collection is an important contribution to the social sciences and the humanities in the 21st century. Contributors include: Peter Hacker, Bastiaan van Fraassen, Daniel N. Robinson, Kenneth Schaffner, Roger Scruton, James K.A. Smith, Richard Swinburne, Lawrence Principe and Richard N. Williams.

The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to the Study of Religion

The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to the Study of Religion

Author: Nickolas P. Roubekas

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781119092780

Category: Religion

Page: 480

View: 320

Explore a rigorous but accessible guide to contemporary approaches to the study of religion from leading voices in the field The Wiley Blackwell Companion to the Study of Religion delivers an expert and insightful analysis of modern perspectives on the study of religion across the humanities and the social sciences. Presupposing no knowledge of the approaches examined in the collection, the book is ideal for undergraduate students who have yet to undertake extensive study in the humanities or social sciences. The book includes perspectives from those in fields as diverse as globalization, cognitive science, the study of emotion, law, esotericism, sex and gender, functionalism, terror, the comparative method, modernism, and postmodernism. Many of the topics covered in the book clearly hail from religious studies, while others are grounded in other areas of academia. All of the chapters contained within are written by recognized authors who show how their chosen discipline contributes to the understanding of the phenomenon of religion. This book also includes topics like: A comprehensive exploration of multiple approaches to religious study, including anthropology, economics, literature, phenomenology, philosophy, psychology, sociology, and theology A review of various topics germane to the study of religion, including the study of the body, cognitive science, the comparative method, death and the afterlife, law, magic, music, and myth A selection of subjects touching on modern trends in extremism and violence, including chapters on terror and violence, fundamentalism, and nationalism A discussion of the influence of modernism and postmodernism in religion Ideal for undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate students in humanities and social science programs taking courses on religion and myth, The Wiley Blackwell Companion to the Study of Religion will also earn a place in the libraries of specialists working in the fields of Religious Studies, Theology, Sociology, Anthropology, Psychology, Political Science, History, and Philosophy.

Teaching Critical Religious Studies

Teaching Critical Religious Studies

Author: Jenna Gray-Hildenbrand

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350228429

Category: Religion

Page: 248

View: 345

Are you teaching religious studies in the best way possible? Do you inadvertently offer simplistic understandings of religion to undergraduate students, only to then unpick them at advanced levels? This book presents case studies of teaching methods that integrate student learning, classroom experiences, and disciplinary critiques. It shows how critiques of the scholarship of religious studies-including but not limited to the World Religions paradigm, Christian normativity, Orientalism, colonialism, race, gender, sexuality, and class-can be effectively integrated into all courses, especially at an introductory level. Integrating advanced critiques from religious studies into actual pedagogical practices, this book offers ways for scholars to rethink their courses to be more reflective of the state of the field. This is essential reading for all scholars in religious studies.

Science and Religion

Science and Religion

Author: Yves Gingras

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781509518944

Category: Science

Page: 272

View: 195

Today we hear renewed calls for a dialogue between science and religion: why has the old question of the relations between science and religion now returned to the public domain and what is at stake in this debate? To answer these questions, historian and sociologist of science Yves Gingras retraces the long history of the troubled relationship between science and religion, from the condemnation of Galileo for heresy in 1633 until his rehabilitation by John Paul II in 1992. He reconstructs the process of the gradual separation of science from theology and religion, showing how God and natural theology became marginalized in the scientific field in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In contrast to the dominant trend among historians of science, Gingras argues that science and religion are social institutions that give rise to incompatible ways of knowing, rooted in different methodologies and forms of knowledge, and that there never was, and cannot be, a genuine dialogue between them. Wide-ranging and authoritative, this new book on one of the fundamental questions of Western thought will be of great interest to students and scholars of the history of science and of religion as well as to general readers who are intrigued by the new and much-publicized conversations about the alleged links between science and religion.

50 Great Myths About Religions

50 Great Myths About Religions

Author: John Morreall

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118554296

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 105

50 Great Myths about Religions is an intriguing,informative, and often humorous introduction to some of the longstanding myths that surround religious belief. This engaging bookwill get its readers thinking about how and why certain myths havearisen, and their continuing influence on our personal andcollective view of religion. Offers a lively, informative, and thought-provoking introduction to some of the common misbeliefs surroundingreligions Discusses myths about religious belief in general, as well asspecific ideas that surround Judaism, Christianity, Islam, atheism,and agnosticism Covers a wide range of myths, from ancient legends such as theBible forbidding pork being eaten because it causes illness, tomodern urban fables, such as Barack Obama being a Muslim Unpacks each myth in turn, explaining why it arose, how itspread, and why the beliefs that stem from it are questionable Includes a fascinating discussion about human nature, and themain characteristics that predispose us to create and circulatemyths to begin with Underpinned by a wide knowledge of academic research, it iswritten by two respected religion scholars and experiencedauthors

Flat Earths and Fake Footnotes

Flat Earths and Fake Footnotes

Author: Derrick Peterson

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781532653339

Category: History

Page: 378

View: 390

We are all haunted by histories. They shape our presuppositions and ballast our judgments. In terms of science and religion this means most of us walk about haunted by rumors of a long war. However, there is no such thing as the “history of the conflict of science and Christianity,” and this is a book about it. In the last half of the twentieth century a sea change in the history of science and religion occurred, revealing not only that the perception of protracted warfare between religion and science was a curious set of mythologies that had been combined together into a sort of supermyth in need of debunking. It was also seen that this collective mythology arose in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries by historians involved in many sides of the debates over Darwin’s discoveries, and from there latched onto the public imagination at large. Flat Earths and Fake Footnotes takes the reader on a journey showing how these myths were constructed, collected together, and eventually debunked. Join us for a story of flat earths and fake footnotes, to uncover the strange tale of how the conflict of science and Christianity was written into history.

Rethinking History, Science, and Religion

Rethinking History, Science, and Religion

Author: Bernard Lightman

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press

ISBN: 9780822987048

Category: Science

Page: 324

View: 857

The historical interface between science and religion was depicted as an unbridgeable conflict in the last quarter of the nineteenth century. Starting in the 1970s, such a conception was too simplistic and not at all accurate when considering the totality of that relationship. This volume evaluates the utility of the “complexity principle” in past, present, and future scholarship. First put forward by historian John Brooke over twenty-five years ago, the complexity principle rejects the idea of a single thesis of conflict or harmony, or integration or separation, between science and religion. Rethinking History, Science, and Religion brings together an interdisciplinary group of scholars at the forefront of their fields to consider whether new approaches to the study of science and culture—such as recent developments in research on science and the history of publishing, the global history of science, the geographical examination of space and place, and science and media—have cast doubt on the complexity thesis, or if it remains a serviceable historiographical model.

Are There Limits to Science?

Are There Limits to Science?

Author: Gillian Straine

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781527500419

Category: Religion

Page: 205

View: 703

This book is the result of the 2016 conference of the UK’s Science and Religion Forum which brings together leading scientific and theological thinkers to reflect together on key issues. The focus was a timely one: Are there limits to Science? Both inside and outside of the academy, the questions of where we seek knowledge and how to discern truth remain high on the agenda. By asking this key question, the conference brought together philosophers, theologians, practitioners and scientists to discuss how they judge these boundary areas and the lay of the land ahead. The resulting conversation is wide-ranging, touching on the discernment of God in nature, the boundary between the physical and mental in human identity, and the importance of taking history seriously. There can be no doubt that the questions and the insights offered in this book are invaluable to anyone seeking to explore the limits of the field of science and religion, and to reflect on its wider implications.