Native California

Native California

Author: Dolan H. Eargle, Jr.

Publisher: Trees Company Press

ISBN: 9780937401118

Category: Social Science

Page: 333

View: 402

This lavishly illustrated book is the only complete and contemporary introductory guide to all the Native peoples in California. Arranged by geographical area and by language groups, Native California includes reservations, rancherias, federally recognized tribes without lands, unrecognized tribes and peoples with out-of-state origins. History, maps, interviews, overviews, essays, informational appendices. copyright 2008

Survival Skills of Native California

Survival Skills of Native California

Author: Paul Douglas Campbell

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

ISBN: 0879059214

Category: Social Science

Page: 466

View: 117

A comprehensive examination of the wisdom and practical arts of California's native population offers step-by-step instructions for utilizing ancient knowledge, such as tool building, fire-making, hunting, fishing, and much more. Original.

Surviving Through the Days

Surviving Through the Days

Author: Herbert W. Luthin

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520222709

Category: Social Science

Page: 630

View: 768

"This unique and original book sets the standard for such volumes. I can't see anyone coming along for quite some time who would be able to supersede it or top it for quality and inclusiveness."—Brian Swann, editor of Coming to Light "It is a masterful treatment of oral literature…a wonderful combination of great verbal art and sound scholarship, carefully crafted so that the collection begins and ends with a powerful creation tale."—Leanne Hinton, author of Flutes of Fire "Since each of the contributing specialists has first-hand familiarity with the material, the translations are of unusual authenticity and the annotations are of unusual insightfulness. Luthin's own introductory sections are especially vivid and well-informed."—William Bright, author of A Coyote Reader

After the First Full Moon in April

After the First Full Moon in April

Author: Josephine Grant Peters

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315435282

Category: Social Science

Page: 222

View: 785

In this extraordinary book Josephine Peters, a respected northern California Indian elder and Native healer, shares her vast, lifelong cultural and plant knowledge. The book begins with Josephine's personal and tribal history and gathering ethics. Josephine then instructs the reader in medicinal and plant food preparations and offers an illustrated catalog of the uses and doses of over 160 plants. At a time of the commercialization of traditional ecological knowledge, Peters presents her rich tradition on her own terms, and according to her spiritual convictions about how her knowledge should be shared. This volume is essential for anyone working in ethnobotany, ethnomedicine, environmental anthropology, Native American studies, and Western and California culture and history.

Trust in the Land

Trust in the Land

Author: Beth Rose Middleton

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816502295

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 933

“The Earth says, God has placed me here. The Earth says that God tells me to take care of the Indians on this earth; the Earth says to the Indians that stop on the Earth, feed them right. . . . God says feed the Indians upon the earth.” —Cayuse Chief Young Chief, Walla Walla Council of 1855 America has always been Indian land. Historically and culturally, Native Americans have had a strong appreciation for the land and what it offers. After continually struggling to hold on to their land and losing millions of acres, Native Americans still have a strong and ongoing relationship to their homelands. The land holds spiritual value and offers a way of life through fishing, farming, and hunting. It remains essential—not only for subsistence but also for cultural continuity—that Native Americans regain rights to land they were promised. Beth Rose Middleton examines new and innovative ideas concerning Native land conservancies, providing advice on land trusts, collaborations, and conservation groups. Increasingly, tribes are working to protect their access to culturally important lands by collaborating with Native and non- Native conservation movements. By using private conservation partnerships to reacquire lost land, tribes can ensure the health and sustainability of vital natural resources. In particular, tribal governments are using conservation easements and land trusts to reclaim rights to lost acreage. Through the use of these and other private conservation tools, tribes are able to protect or in some cases buy back the land that was never sold but rather was taken from them. Trust in the Land sets into motion a new wave of ideas concerning land conservation. This informative book will appeal to Native and non-Native individuals and organizations interested in protecting the land as well as environmentalists and government agencies.

California through Native Eyes

California through Native Eyes

Author: William J. Bauer, Jr., Jr.

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295806693

Category: Social Science

Page: 184

View: 712

Most California histories begin with the arrival of the Spanish missionaries in the late eighteenth century and conveniently skip to the Gold Rush of 1849. Noticeably absent from these stories are the perspectives and experiences of the people who lived on the land long before European settlers arrived. Historian William Bauer seeks to correct that oversight through an innovative approach that tells California history strictly through Native perspectives. Using oral histories of Concow, Pomo, and Paiute workers, taken as part of a New Deal federal works project, Bauer reveals how Native peoples have experienced and interpreted the history of the land we now call California. Combining these oral histories with creation myths and other oral traditions, he demonstrates the importance of sacred landscapes and animals and other nonhuman actors to the formation of place and identity. He also examines tribal stories of ancestors who prophesied the coming of white settlers and uses their recollections of the California Indian Wars to push back against popular narratives that seek to downplay Native resistance. The result both challenges the �California story� and enriches it with new voices and important points of view, serving as a model for understanding Native historical perspectives in other regions.

The Oxford Handbook of American Indian History

The Oxford Handbook of American Indian History

Author: Frederick E. Hoxie

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199858897

Category: History

Page: 644

View: 676

The Oxford Handbook of American Indian History presents the story of the indigenous peoples who lived-and live-in the territory that became the United States. It describes the major aspects of the historical change that occurred over the past 500 years with essays by leading experts, both Native and non-Native, that focus on significant moments of upheaval and change.

Viola Martinez, California Paiute

Viola Martinez, California Paiute

Author: Diana Meyers Bahr

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806179599

Category: Social Science

Page: 214

View: 808

The life story of Viola Martinez, an Owens Valley Paiute Indian of eastern California, extends over nine decades of the twentieth century. Viola experienced forced assimilation in an Indian boarding school, overcame racial stereotypes to pursue a college degree, and spent several years working at a Japanese American internment camp during World War II. Finding herself poised uncertainly between Indian and white worlds, Viola was determined to turn her marginalized existence into an opportunity for personal empowerment. In Viola Martinez, California Paiute, Diana Meyers Bahr recounts Viola’s extraordinary life story and examines her strategies for dealing with acculturation. Bahr allows Viola to tell her story in her own words, beginning with her early years in Owens Valley, where she learned traditional lifeways, such as gathering piñons, from her aunt. In the summers, she traveled by horse and buggy into the High Sierras where her aunt traded with Basque sheepherders. Viola was sent to the Sherman Institute, a federal boarding school with a mandate to assimilate American Indians into U.S. mainstream culture. Punished for speaking Paiute at the boarding school, Viola and her cousin climbed fifty-foot palm trees to speak their native language secretly. Realizing that, despite her efforts, she was losing her language, Viola resolved not just to learn English but to master it. She earned a degree from Santa Barbara State College and pursued a career as social worker. During World War II, Viola worked as an employment counselor for Japanese American internees at the Manzanar War Relocation Authority camp. Later in life, she became a teacher and worked tirelessly as a founding member of the Los Angeles American Indian Education Commission.