Architecture, Urban Space and War

Architecture, Urban Space and War

Author: Mirjana Ristic

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319767710

Category: Social Science

Page: 260

View: 102

This book investigates architectural and urban dimensions of the ethnic-nationalist conflict in Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia and Herzegovina, during and after the siege of 1992–1995. Focusing on the wartime destruction of a portion of the cityscape in central Sarajevo and its post-war reconstruction, re-inscription and memorialization, the book reveals how such spatial transformations become complicit in the struggle for reconfiguration of the city’s territory, boundaries and place identity. Drawing on original research, the study highlights the capacities of architecture and urban space to mediate terror, violence and resistance, and to deal with heritage of the war and act a catalyst for ethnic segregation or reconciliation. Based on a multi-disciplinary methodological approach grounded in architectural and urban theory, the spatial turn in critical social theory and assemblage thinking, as well as techniques of spatial analysis, in particular morphological mapping, the book provides an innovative spatial framework for analyzing the political role of contemporary cities.

Narrating the Self

Narrating the Self

Author: Tomi Suzuki

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804731621

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 392

Narrating the Self examines the historical formation of modern Japanese literature through a fundamental reassessment of its most characteristic form, the 'I-novel, ' an autobiographical narrative thought to recount the details of the writer's personal life thinly veiled as fiction. Closely analysing a range of texts from the late nineteenth century through to the present day, the author argues that the 'I-novel' is not a given form of text that can be objectively identified, but a historically constructed reading mode and cultural paradigm that not only regulated the production and reception of literary texts but also defined cultural identity and national tradition. Instead of emphasising, as others have, the thematic and formal elements of novels traditionally placed in this category, she explores the historical formation of a field of discourse in which the 'I-novel' was retroactively created and defined.

The Slave's Narrative

The Slave's Narrative

Author: Henry Louis Gates

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195066562

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 342

View: 239

The autobiographical narratives of black ex-slaves published in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries constitute the largest body of literature produced by slaves in human history. Black slaves in the New World created a veritable "literature of escape" depicting the overwhelming horrors of human bondage. These narratives served the abolitionist movement not only as evidence of the slaves' degradation but also of their "intellectual capacity." Accordingly, this literature has elicited a wealth of analysis- and controversy- from its initial publication right up to our day. This volume charts the response to the black slave's narrative from 1750 to the present. The book consists of three sections: selected reviews of slave narratives, dating from 1750 to 1861; essays examining how such narratives serve as historical material; and essays exploring the narratives as literary artifacts.

Young People and the Shaping of Public Space in Melbourne, 1870–1914

Young People and the Shaping of Public Space in Melbourne, 1870–1914

Author: Dr Simon Sleight

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781472402899

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 777

Baby booms have a long history. In 1870, colonial Melbourne was ‘perspiring juvenile humanity’ with an astonishing 42 per cent of the city’s inhabitants aged 14 and under - a demographic anomaly resulting from the gold rushes of the 1850s. Within this context, Simon Sleight enters the heated debate concerning the future prospects of ‘Young Australia’ and the place of the colonial child within the incipient Australian nation. Looking beyond those institutional sites so often assessed by historians of childhood, he ranges across the outdoor city to chart the relationship between a discourse about youth, youthful experience and the shaping of new urban spaces. Play, street work, consumerism, courtship, gang-related activities and public parades are examined using a plethora of historical sources to reveal a hitherto hidden layer of city life. Capturing the voices of young people as well as those of their parents, Sleight alerts us to the ways in which young people shaped the emergent metropolis by appropriating space and attempting to impress upon the city their own desires. Here a dynamic youth culture flourished well before the discovery of the ‘teenager’ in the mid-twentieth century; here young people and the city grew up together.

Water Societies and Technologies from the Past and Present

Water Societies and Technologies from the Past and Present

Author: Mark Altaweel

Publisher: UCL Press

ISBN: 9781911576716

Category: Social Science

Page: 332

View: 469

Today our societies face great challenges with water, in terms of both quantity and quality, but many of these challenges have already existed in the past. Focusing on Asia, Water Societies and Technologies from the Past and Present seeks to highlight the issues that emerge or re-emerge across different societies and periods, and asks what they can tell us about water sustainability. Incorporating cutting-edge research and pioneering field surveys on past and present water management practices, the interdisciplinary contributors together identify how societies managed water resource challenges and utilised water in ways that allowed them to evolve, persist, or drastically alter their environment. The case studies, from different periods, ancient and modern, and from different regions, including Egypt, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Southwest United States, the Indus Basin, the Yangtze River, the Mesopotamian floodplain, the early Islamic city of Sultan Kala in Turkmenistan, and ancient Korea, offer crucial empirical data to readers interested in comparing the dynamics of water management practices across time and space, and to those who wish to understand water-related issues through conceptual and quantitative models of water use. The case studies also challenge classical theories on water management and social evolution, examine and establish the deep historical roots and ecological foundations of water sustainability issues, and contribute new grounds for innovations in sustainable urban planning and ecological resilience.

The Oxford Handbook of Thucydides

The Oxford Handbook of Thucydides

Author: Sara Forsdyke

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199340385

Category: Greece

Page: 736

View: 185

The Oxford Handbook of Thucydides contains essays on Thucydides as an historian, thinker, and writer. It also features papers on Thucydides' intellectual context and ancient reception. The creative juxtaposition of historical, literary, philosophical, and reception studies allows for a bettergrasp of Thucydides' complex project and its intellectual context, while at the same time providing a comprehensive introduction to Thucydides' ideas. The Oxford Handbook of Thucydides is organized into four sections of papers: History, Historiography, Political Theory, and Context and Reception. It therefore bridges traditionally divided disciplines. The authors engaged to write the forty chapters for this volume include both well-known scholarsand less well-known innovators, who bring fresh ideas and new points of view. Articles avoid technical jargon and long footnotes, and are written in an accessible style.Finally, The Oxford Handbook of Thucydides includes a thorough introduction, which introduces every paper, as well as two maps and an up-to-date bibliography that will enable further and more specific study. It therefore offers a comprehensive introduction to a thinker and writer whose simultaneousdepth and innovativeness have been the focus of intense literary and philosophical study since ancient times.

Introspection and Consciousness

Introspection and Consciousness

Author: Declan Smithies

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN: 9780199744794

Category: Philosophy

Page: 425

View: 758

The topic of introspection stands at the interface between questions in epistemology about the nature of self-knowledge and questions in the philosophy of mind about the nature of consciousness. What is the nature of introspection such that it provides us with a distinctive way of knowing about our own conscious mental states? And what is the nature of consciousness such that we can know about our own conscious mental states by introspection? How should we understand the relationship between consciousness and introspective self-knowledge? Should we explain consciousness in terms of introspective self-knowledge or vice versa? Until recently, questions in epistemology and the philosophy of mind were pursued largely in isolation from one another. This volume aims to integrate these two lines of research by bringing together fourteen new essays and one reprinted essay on the relationship between introspection, self-knowledge, and consciousness.

Staging England in the Elizabethan History Play

Staging England in the Elizabethan History Play

Author: Ralf Hertel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317050797

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 282

View: 736

Applying current political theory on nationhood as well as methods established by recent performance studies, this study sheds new light on the role the public theatre played in the rise of English national identity around 1600. It situates selected history plays by Shakespeare and Marlowe in the context of non-fictional texts (such as historiographies, chorographies, political treatises, or dictionary entries) and cultural artefacts (such as maps or portraits), and thus highlights the circulation, and mutation, of national thought in late sixteenth-century culture. At the same time, it goes beyond a New Historicist approach by foregrounding the performative surplus of the theatre event that is so essential for the shaping of collective identity. How, this study crucially asks, does the performative art of theatre contribute to the dynamics of the formation of national identity? Although theories about the nature of nationalism vary, a majority of theorists agree that notions of a shared territory and history, as well as questions of religion, class and gender play crucial roles in the shaping of national identity. These factors inform the structure of this book, and each is examined individually. In contrast to existing publications, this inquiry does not take for granted a pre-existing national identity that simply manifested itself in the literary works of the period; nor does it proceed from preconceived notions of the playwrights’ political views. Instead, it understands the early modern stage as an essentially contested space in which conflicting political positions are played off against each other, and it inquires into how the imaginative work of negotiating these stances eventually contributed to a rising national self-awareness in the spectators.

Conversations about Time

Conversations about Time

Author: Gavin Lucas

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000437423

Category: Social Science

Page: 130

View: 682

This book presents a conversation between two prominent archaeologists who have been exploring the concept of time in their discipline for several decades. It is a discussion on key issues of time in archaeology filtered through their unique perspectives, which sometimes meet and at other times, clash. Key features include discussions on the nature of change and time in the archaeological record, the relation between the present and past, the connection between time and the goals of archaeology and the relevance of the Anthropocene to disciplinary practice. Situated in how the authors' own views on the topic of time have developed over their careers, the conversation offers an intimate and personal insight into how two leading scholars think and debate a topic of central importance to the discipline. All archaeologists with an interest in contemporary theory and the topic of time will find this book of relevance. Also the student who wants a front-row seat onto a live debate on this topic will find it an invaluable complement to the more traditional textbook.

Christ Child

Christ Child

Author: Stephen J. Davis

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300149456

Category: Religion

Page: 417

View: 814

Little is known about the early childhood of Jesus Christ. But in the decades after his death, stories began circulating about his origins. One collection of such tales was the so-called Infancy Gospel of Thomas, known in antiquity as the Paidika or “Childhood Deeds” of Jesus. In it, Jesus not only performs miracles while at play (such as turning clay birds into live sparrows) but also gets enmeshed in a series of interpersonal conflicts and curses to death children and teachers who rub him the wrong way. How would early readers have made sense of this young Jesus? In this highly innovative book, Stephen Davis draws on current theories about how human communities construe the past to answer this question. He explores how ancient readers would have used texts, images, places, and other key reference points from their own social world to understand the Christ child’s curious actions. He then shows how the figure of a young Jesus was later picked up and exploited in the context of medieval Jewish-Christian and Christian-Muslim encounters. Challenging many scholarly assumptions, Davis adds a crucial dimension to the story of how Christian history was created.