Texas Women First

Texas Women First

Author: Sherrie S. McLeRoy

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781625852403

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 103

American history is teeming with unconventional, trailblazing Lone Star women with big, unprecedented achievements--outstanding, outrageous, outré women who know all about being "Texas Big" and being first. Texas's own Bessie Coleman was the first black person in the world to earn a pilot's license. Students and typists the world over breathed a sigh of relief when San Antonio-born Bette Nesmith Graham released Mistake Out, now known as Liquid Paper®. Way ahead of the curve, University of Texas graduate Aida Nydia Barrera saw the need for bilingual educational programming and in 1970 started Carrascolendas, the first television show of its kind in the country. In 1981, El Paso's Sandra Day O'Connor became the first female justice of the United States Supreme Court. Join author Sherrie McLeRoy for an introduction to the exceptional women of Lone Star history.

Black Texas Women: A Sourcebook

Black Texas Women: A Sourcebook

Author: Ruthe Winegarten

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292785564

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

View: 641

When Black Texas Women: 150 Years of Trial and Triumph was published in 1995, it was acclaimed as the first comprehensive history of black women’s struggles and achievements. This companion volume contains the original source materials that Ruthe Winegarten uncovered during her extensive research. Like a time capsule of black women’s history, A Sourcebook includes petitions from free women of color, lawsuits, slave testimonies, wills, plantation journals, club minutes, autobiographies, ads, congressional reports, contracts, prison records, college catalogues, newspaper clippings, protest letters, and much more. In addition to the documents, a biographical section highlights the lives of women from various walks of life. The book concludes with a timeline that begins in 1777 and reaches to 1992. This wealth of original material will be a treasure trove for scholars and general readers interested in the emerging field of black women’s history.

Black Texas Women: 150 Years of Trial and Triumph

Black Texas Women: 150 Years of Trial and Triumph

Author: Ruthe Winegarten

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292786653

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 448

View: 751

Women of all colors have shaped families, communities, institutions, and societies throughout history, but only in recent decades have their contributions been widely recognized, described, and celebrated. This book presents the first comprehensive history of black Texas women, a previously neglected group whose 150 years of continued struggle and some successes against the oppression of racism and sexism deserve to be better known and understood. Beginning with slave and free women of color during the Texas colonial period and concluding with contemporary women who serve in the Texas legislature and the United States Congress, Ruthe Winegarten organizes her history both chronologically and topically. Her narrative sparkles with the life stories of individual women and their contributions to the work force, education, religion, the club movement, community building, politics, civil rights, and culture. The product of extensive archival and oral research and illustrated with over 200 photographs, this groundbreaking work will be equally appealing to general readers and to scholars of women’s history, black history, American studies, and Texas history.

Texas Ranch Women

Texas Ranch Women

Author: Carmen Goldthwaite

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781625851291

Category: History

Page: 199

View: 297

The author of Texas Dames shares a new collection of profiles featuring the incredible women who helped build the Lone Star State. Texas would not be Texas without the formidable women of its past. Beneath the sunbonnets and Stetsons, the women of the Lone Star State carved out ranches and breathed new life into arid spreads of land. When husbands, sons and fathers fell, bold Texas women were there to take the reins. Throughout the centuries, the women of Texas's ranches defended home and hearth with cannon and shot. They rescued hostages. They nurtured livestock through hard winters and long droughts and drove them up the cattle trails. They built communities and saw to it that faith and education prevailed for their children and their communities. Join author Carmen Goldthwaite in an inspiring survey of fierce Lone Star ladies.

Texas Women Writers

Texas Women Writers

Author: Sylvia Ann Grider

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 0890967652

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 461

View: 448

Texas Women Writers: A Tradition of Their Own is a sweeping account of a rich yet largely ignored literary history covering over 160 years of women's writing in the Lone Star State. Their writings vary widely in theme, setting, and voice; nevertheless, these writers share a distinct tradition that is in part defined by their isolation due to both geography and gender and is wholly different from that of their male counterparts. The introductory essay by the editors covers the history of women writers in Texas from the pioneers to the postmodernists, providing the context and theme for the survey. Critical-biographical portraits of the lives and careers of individual writers both major and minor follow: from novelists, dramatists, and poets, to writers of short stories, children's books, and creative nonfiction. Other essays examine the developmental history of major genres in the region and chronologically review each generation and the particular challenges of time and place that shaped their work. The careers of African-American and Tejana writers are also examined as part of newly emerging literary traditions.

Women in Texas History

Women in Texas History

Author: Angela Boswell

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781623497071

Category: History

Page: 366

View: 164

In recent decades, a small but growing number of historians have dedicated their tireless attention to analyzing the role of women in Texas history. Each contribution—and there have been many—represents a brick in the wall of new Texas history. From early Native societies to astronauts, Women in Texas History assembles those bricks into a carefully crafted structure as the first book to cover the full scope of Texas women’s history. By emphasizing the differences between race and ethnicity, Angela Boswell uses three broad themes to tie together the narrative of women in Texas history. First, the physical and geographic challenges of Texas as a place significantly affected women’s lives, from the struggles of isolated frontier farming to the opportunities and problems of increased urbanization. Second, the changing landscape of legal and political power continued to shape women’s lives and opportunities, from the ballot box to the courthouse and beyond. Finally, Boswell demonstrates the powerful influence of social and cultural forces on the identity, agency, and everyday life of women in Texas. In challenging male-dominated legal and political systems, Texan women shaped (and were shaped by) class, religion, community organizations, literary and artistic endeavors, and more. Women in Texas History is the first book to narrate the entire span of Texas women’s history and marks a major achievement in telling the full story of the Lone Star State. Historians and general readers alike will find this book an informative and enjoyable read for anyone interested in the history of Texas or the history of women.

Texas Through Women's Eyes

Texas Through Women's Eyes

Author: Judith N. McArthur

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292723030

Category: History

Page: 295

View: 763

"This is social history at its very best...The wide selection of firsthand accounts found in this text draw the reader in, and most are absolutely fascinating...This volume will make a significant contribution to the field of Texas women's history, and I predict it will be the one book to which scholars and the reading public turn for information on twentieth-century Texas women."-Elizabeth Hayes Turner, Professor of History, University of North Texas Texas Women broke barriers throughout the twentieth century, winning the right to vote, expanding their access to higher education, entering new professions, participating fully in civic and political life, and planning their families. Yet these major achievements have hardly been recognized in histories of twentieth-century Texas. By contrast, Texas Through Women's Eyes offers a fascinating overview of women's experiences and achievements in the twentieth century, with an inclusive focus on rural women, working-class women, and women of color. Judith N. McArthur and Harold L. Smith trace the history of Texas women through four eras. They discuss how women entered the public sphere to work for social reforms and the right to vote during the Progressive era (1900-1920); how they continued working for reform and social justice and for greater opportunities in education and the workforce during the Great Depression and World War II (1920-1945); how African American and Mexican American women fought for labor and civil rights while Anglo women laid the foundation for two-party politics during the postwar years (1945-1965); and how second-wave feminists (1965-2000) promoted diverse and sometimes competing goals, including passage of the Equal Rights Amendment, reproductive freedom, gender equity in sports, and the rise of the New Right and the Republican party. The authors take particular account of the interactions between genders and the hierarchies of race and ethnicity as they synthesize information from published histories with their own original research into women's lives. They also include a wealth of first-person accountsùwomen's letters, memoirs, and oral histories. This lively combination will appeal to a wide audience.

Texas Women

Texas Women

Author: Elizabeth Hayes Turner

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820337449

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 526

View: 239

"This is a collection of biographies and composite essays of Texas women, contextualized over the course of history to include subjects that reflect the enormous racial, class, and religious diversity of the state. Offering insights into the complex ways that Texas' position on the margins of the United States has shaped a particular kind of gendered experience there, the volume also demonstrates how the larger questions in United States women's history are answered or reconceived in the state. Beginning with Juliana Barr's essay, which asserts that 'women marked the lines of dominion among Spanish and Indian nations in Texas' and explodes the myth of Spanish domination in colonial Texas, the essays examine the ways that women were able to use their borderland status to stretch the boundaries of their own lives. Eric Walther demonstrates that the constant changing of governments in Texas (Spanish, Mexican, Texan, and U.S.) gave slaves the opportunities to resist their oppression because of the differences in the laws of slavery under Spanish or English or American law. Gabriela Gonzalez examines the activism of Jovita Idar on behalf of civil rights for Mexicans and Mexican Americans on both sides of the border. Renee Laegreid argues that female rodeo contestants employed a "unique regional interplay of masculine and feminine behaviors" to shape their identities as cowgirls"--Site web de l'éditeur.

Texas Women on the Cattle Trails

Texas Women on the Cattle Trails

Author: Sara R. Massey

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1585445436

Category: History

Page: 326

View: 669

Tells the stories of sixteen women who drove cattle up the trail from Texas during the last half of the nineteenth century.

A Love Letter to Texas Women

A Love Letter to Texas Women

Author: Sarah Bird

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9781477309650

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 80

View: 485

What is it that distinguishes Texas women—the famous Yellow Rose and her descendants? Is it that combination of graciousness and grit that we revere in First Ladies Laura Bush and Lady Bird Johnson? The rapier-sharp wit that Ann Richards and Molly Ivins used to skewer the good ole boy establishment? The moral righteousness with which Barbara Jordan defended the US constitution? An unnatural fondness for Dr Pepper and queso? In her inimitable style, Sarah Bird pays tribute to the Texas Woman in all her glory and all her contradictions. She humorously recalls her own early bewildered attempts to understand Lone Star gals, from the big-haired, perfectly made-up ladies at the Hyde Park Beauty Salon to her intellectual, quinoa-eating roommates at Seneca House Co-op for Graduate Women. After decades of observing Texas women, Bird knows the species as few others do. A Love Letter to Texas Women is a must-have guide for newcomers to the state and the ideal gift to tell any Yellow Rose how special she is.

Women Pioneers in Texas Medicine

Women Pioneers in Texas Medicine

Author: Elizabeth Silverthorne

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 089096789X

Category: History

Page: 282

View: 941

The pioneering figures presented here have forged new paths for women in fields ranging from nursing, pharmacy, public health, and dentistry to general and hospital practice, hospice care, virology, surgery, and psychiatry. Their stories reveal the special obstacles they faced and overcame as women practicing in a demanding, traditionally all-male field. They also chronicle the history of medicine in the state generally since, although there was discrimination and resistance to accepting them, their accomplishments paralleled and in some instances led the development of medical practice and specialization. Using vignettes and biographical details garnered from sparse available literature, newspaper archives, typescripts found in various libraries around the state, and interviews, Elizabeth Silverthorne and Geneva Fulgham have created profiles of women ranging from traditional roles such as native herbalists and midwives through contemporary pioneers in fields like genetics and nuclear medicine. Drawing on subjects across the centuries throughout Texas' geographical regions and from diverse ethnic groups, they have painted rounded portraits of the women, showing their educational achievements, personalities, commitments, family lives, and hobbies. The stories of these pioneering women, told in clear and compelling prose, are fascinating and even inspiring. The accomplishments of the women heighten our understanding of the ways in which women have defied stereotype. Through personal persistence and dedication to their chosen fields, often against great odds, the women profiled here contributed to an elevated status for all women in the state.

Texas Monthly

Texas Monthly

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 160

View: 522

Since 1973, TEXAS MONTHLY has chronicled life in contemporary Texas, reporting on vital issues such as politics, the environment, industry, and education. As a leisure guide, TEXAS MONTHLY continues to be the indispensable authority on the Texas scene, covering music, the arts, travel, restaurants, museums, and cultural events with its insightful recommendations.