The Future of Consumer Credit Regulation

The Future of Consumer Credit Regulation

Author: Michelle Kelly-Louw

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351889216

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 256

View: 465

Effective regulation of consumer credit in modern society is an ever-changing challenge. As new forms of credit emerge in free societies, regulation often lags behind. This volume explores contemporary problems related to the regulation of consumer credit in market economies with a focus on credit extended to the most vulnerable and poorest members of the community. Written by experts in the field of consumer credit regulation from Europe, North America, Australia and South Africa, the book examines some of the most important consumer credit issues facing consumers today and proposes innovative ways to protect the consumer interest in those markets.

The Regulation of Consumer Credit

The Regulation of Consumer Credit

Author: Sarah Brown

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN: 1784712485

Category:

Page: 232

View: 110

This incisive book gives a comprehensive overview of the regulation of consumer credit in both the US and the UK. It covers policy, procedure and the dynamics of the consumer credit relationship to advocate for a balanced approach in achieving more effective consumer protection. Sarah Brown traces the development of the consumer credit relationship on both sides of the Atlantic, analysing the underlying rationale and policy themes that continue to inform the shaping of the regulatory agenda. The author compares the ways in which the consumer credit relationship is now managed, including supervisory frameworks and the roles of regulators, and provides new perspectives on current arguments in credit consumer protection. Important topical issues such as unfairness, over-indebtedness, predatory lending, vulnerability and questions of responsibility are addressed, before concluding with a recommendation for the best way forward based on a balance of interests. Researchers and students aiming to understand the processes and broader aspects of consumer credit regulation will find this book invaluable, particularly those with an interest in comparative analysis in this context. It will also prove useful to US and UK policy-makers considering future approaches and reform, as well as practitioners interested in frameworks of consumer credit protection.

Moving Forward

Moving Forward

Author: Nicolas P. Retsinas

Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

ISBN: 0815705042

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 264

View: 749

The recent collapse of the mortgage market revealed fractures in the credit market that have deep roots in the system's structure, conduct, and regulation. The time has come for a clear-eyed assessment of what happened and how the system should be strengthened and restructured. Such reform will have a profound and lasting impact on the capacity of Americans to use credit to build assets and finance consumption. Moving Forward explores what caused the crisis and, more important, focuses on the path ahead. The challenge remains the same as ever: protect consumers, ensure fairness, and guarantee soundness of the financial system without stifling innovation and overly restricting access to credit and consumer choice. Nicolas Retsinas, Eric Belsky, and their colleagues aim to stimulate debate based on analysis of the opportunities and challenges presented by the various components of global capital markets: financial engineering, risk assessment and management, specialization of financial intermediation, and marketing methods. The contributors—leaders in business, government, academia, and the nonprofit sector—discuss new research and ideas about the future of credit markets, including how improvements might be shaped by industry leaders. Contributors: John Y. Campbell, Harvard University; Marsha J. Courchane, Charles River Associates; Ren Essene, Federal Reserve Board; Allen Fishbein, Federal Reserve Board; Howell E. Jackson, Harvard Law School; Melissa Koide, Center for Financial Services Innovation; Michael Lea, San Diego State University; Eugene Ludwig, Promontory Financial Group; Brigitte C. Madrian, Harvard Kennedy School; Nela Richardson, Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University; Rachel Schneider, Center for Financial Services Innovation; Peter Tufano, Harvard Business School; Peter M. Zorn, Freddie Mac

The Impact of Public Policy on Consumer Credit

The Impact of Public Policy on Consumer Credit

Author: Thomas A. Durkin

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461514152

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 336

View: 295

As both the twenty-first century and the new millennium opened and the old eras passed into history, individuals and organizations throughout the world advanced their listings of the most significant people and events in their respective specialties. Possibly more important, the tum of the clock and calendar also offered these same observers a good reason to glance into the crystal ball. Presumably, the past is of greatest interest to most people when it permits better understanding of the present, and maybe even limited insight into the outlook. In keeping with the reflective mood of the time, the staff and friends of the Credit Research Center (CRC) at Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business noted that the beginning of the new millennium also marked the beginning of the second quarter-century of the Center's existence. The Center began at the Krannert Graduate School of Management at Purdue University in 1974 and moved to the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University in 1997. The silver anniversary of its founding offered the occasion for creating more than another listing of significant past accomplishments and milestones. Rather, it offered the opportunity and, indeed, a mandate for CRC as an academic research center, to undertake a retrospective and future look into the status of research questions pertaining to consumer credit markets. For this reason, the Center organized a research conference which was held in Washington, D. C.

Consumer Credit in Europe

Consumer Credit in Europe

Author: Daniela Vandone

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 3790821012

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 134

View: 896

Consumer credit has become a topical issue for researchers, regulators and the banking industry in Europe as a result of increasing market integration, regulatory changes and a growing tendency of households to use debt to finance consumption. This study uses a cross-country approach to look at a broad range of issues related to consumer credit in Europe. Focusing on both the supply and demand sides, it takes into account the structure and performance of financial intermediaries, the socio-demographic and economic profile of households and their risk of over-indebtedness, as well as the regulatory framework, such as the new Consumer Credit Directive. In the light of this analysis, measures for the prevention and management of over-indebtedness are presented. This book is essential for postgraduate students and specialists in financial institutions, for regulators and policy-makers who are in charge of efficiency and stability of financial systems.

Usury Laws

Usury Laws

Author: Udo Reifner

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 9783848242450

Category: Political Science

Page: 500

View: 803

Usury is the historical denomination of interest rate restrictions. The principle of Usura in the Roman ius communis as well as in canonic law started from the assumption that money lent from others should not bear interest. This is because unless the creditor could prove that the withhold of money caused him damage, money could not create fruits. While the upcoming trade economy developed the idea that the elapsed time between the claim and its fulfillment should be priced with interest, a second principle of interest limitation became important: the laesio enormis: interest rates should be limited to the double of the average. Since consumer credit has spread into the market economy and become a major source of allocating future income to present needs (extended mainly by rationally acting banks), both principles have lost of their impact onto the credit market. But a number of member states have newly introduced rate ceilings. With the financial crisis, the discussion whether interest rates in consumer credit needs more regulation gathered momentum. The present study was commissioned by DG Internal Market. It has two parts: a socio-legal analysis of all forms of direct and indirect limitations for the pricing of credit by the Institute for Financial Services (iff) in Hamburg and an economic part investigating the effects of such restrictions to the consumer credit market by the Center for European Economic Policy (ZEW) in Mannheim. Prof. Dr. Udo Reifner is professor of commercial law at Trento University and research director of the iff. Prof. Dr. Michael Schroeder is professor for Asset Management at the Frankfurt School of Finance & Management and head of the research on \"International Financial Markets and Finance Management” at ZEW.

Countering Economic Crime

Countering Economic Crime

Author: Axel Palmer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351852180

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 272

View: 220

Economic crime is a significant feature of the UK’s economic landscape and yet despite the government’s bold mission statements ‘to hold those suspected of financial wrongdoing to account’ as part of their ‘day of reckoning’ and ‘serious about white-collar crime’ agenda, there is a sense that this is still not being done effectively. This book examines the history of the creation of the UK’s anti-economic crime institutions and accompanying legislation, providing a critique of their effectiveness. The book analyses whether the recent regulatory regime is fit for purpose as well as being appropriate for the future. In order to explore how the UK’s economic crime strategies could be improved the book takes a comparative approach analysing policy and legislative responses to economic crime in the United States and Australia in order to determine whether the UK could or should import similar structures or laws to improve the enforcement of UK economic crime.

Regulating Consumer Credit

Regulating Consumer Credit

Author: Great Britain: National Audit Office

Publisher: The Stationery Office

ISBN: 0102980578

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 52

View: 740

UK consumers borrowed £176 billion in 2011-12 from credit card companies, small businesses offering hire purchase arrangements and payday lenders. The NAO estimates the Office of Fair Trading saved consumers £8.60 for every £1 it spent on enforcing regulations in 2010-11 by taking action against non-compliant firms. During the same period, nevertheless, consumers lost at least £450 million from problems that regulation did not address, such as malpractice by firms that was not reported to the regulator. Consumers can also make poor choices themselves. The OFT is not resourced to carry out on a day-to-day basis either the supervision of firms or the monitoring of their compliance with licence standards. This means it can act only when it receives information of non-compliant behaviour by a firm. Therefore some harm must already have taken place in order to prevent further losses to consumers. The OFT funds consumer credit regulation solely from licence fees, and today's report shows it had £11.5 million to regulate the market in 2011-12 which is not enough. Furthermore, weaknesses in the OFT's management information mean it cannot be sure these limited resources are being targeted to the areas of greatest risk to consumers. The OFT's limited understanding of the costs of enforcement means it does not have an accurate picture of the proportion of its budget which is spent on different activities. In addition, the OFT does not collect information on the level of lending provided by each firm, and therefore does not have a quantified understanding of the supply in the market

Handbook of Research on International Consumer Law

Handbook of Research on International Consumer Law

Author: Geraint G. Howells

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN: 9781849806312

Category: Law

Page: 608

View: 327

This is a truly international effort, and one with a strong commitment to human rights by the highly reputable authors coming from different jurisdictions! The many facets of today s consumer law are presented to the reader, including developing countries a fascinating effort in a dynamically emerging field of law! We are comprehensively informed about such bread and butter areas as advertising, unfair terms, consumer guarantees, product safety and liability, consumer credit, and redress. But traditional consumer law concepts and remedies are facing challenges in more complex areas, like services of general internet where consumers and private users should enjoy equal access to universal services , with the internet where speed must not be a pretext to eliminate standards of fair dealing, with risky investment services under the problematic paradigm shift from investor protection to investor confidence . A book to read, to think about, to work with for everybody interested in the future of consumer markets and law in a time of economic crisis! Norbert Reich, University of Bremen, Germany This is a richly interesting collection of essays, written by leading names in the field. It offers a thoroughly reliable survey of key tensions and challenges in modern consumer law and brilliantly combines thematic overview with detailed analysis. It will stimulate comparative thinking, it will provide a source of information and it will be welcomed by consumer law scholars all over the world. Stephen Weatherill, University of Oxford, UK Consumer law and policy has emerged in the last half-century as a major policy concern for all nations. This Handbook of original contributions provides an international and comparative analysis of central issues in consumer law and policy in developed and developing economies. The Handbook encompasses questions of both social policy and effective business regulation. Many of the issues are common to all countries and are becoming increasingly globalised due to the growth in international trade and technological developments such as the Internet. The authors provide a broad coverage of both substantive topics and institutional questions concerning optimal approaches to enforcement and the role of class actions in consumer policy. It also includes comparative insights into the influential EU and US models of consumer law and relates consumer law to contemporary trends in human rights law. Written by a carefully selected group of international experts, this text represents an authoritative resource for understanding contemporary and future developments in consumer law. This Handbook will provide students, researchers and policymakers with an insight to the main policy debates in each context and provide models of legal regulation to assist in the evaluation of laws and the development of consumer law and policy.