The Ages of Wonder Woman

The Ages of Wonder Woman

Author: Joseph J. Darowski

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476613611

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 856

Created in 1941 by the psychologist William Marston, Wonder Woman would go on to have one of the longest continuous runs of published comic book adventures in the history of the industry. More than 70 years after her debut, Wonder Woman remains a popular culture icon. Throughout the intervening years many comic book creators have had a hand in guiding her story, resulting in different interpretations of the Amazon Princess. In this collection of new essays, each examines a specific period or storyline from Wonder Woman comic books and analyzes that story in regard to contemporary issues in American society.

Wonder Woman Unbound

Wonder Woman Unbound

Author: Tim Hanley

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 9781613749098

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 520

“I’ve never seen more information about Wonder Woman than in Wonder Woman Unbound. Tim Hanley tells us everything we’ve never asked about Wonder Woman, . . . from her mythic Golden Age origins through her dismal Silver Age years as a lovesick romance comic character, and worse yet, when she lost her costume and powers in the late 1960s. Our favorite Amazon’s saga becomes upbeat again with the 1970s advent of Gloria Steinem and Ms. magazine, and Lynda Carter’s unforgettable portrayal of her on television. And it’s all told with a dollop of humor!” —Trina Robbins, author of Pretty in Ink With her golden lasso and her bullet-deflecting bracelets, Wonder Woman is a beloved icon of female strength in a world of male superheroes. But this close look at her history portrays a complicated heroine who is more than just a female Superman. Tim Hanley explores Wonder Woman’s lost history, delving into her comic book and its spin-offs as well as the motivations of her creators, to showcase the peculiar journey of a twentieth-century icon—from the 1940s, when her comics advocated female superiority but were also colored by bondage imagery and hidden lesbian leanings, to her resurgence as a feminist symbol in the 1970s and beyond. Tim Hanley is a comic book historian. His blog, Straitened Circumstances, discusses Wonder Woman and women in comics, and his column “Gendercrunching” runs monthly on Bleeding Cool. He lives in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman

Author: Noah Berlatsky

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813575742

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 230

William Marston was an unusual man—a psychologist, a soft-porn pulp novelist, more than a bit of a carny, and the (self-declared) inventor of the lie detector. He was also the creator of Wonder Woman, the comic that he used to express two of his greatest passions: feminism and women in bondage. Comics expert Noah Berlatsky takes us on a wild ride through the Wonder Woman comics of the 1940s, vividly illustrating how Marston’s many quirks and contradictions, along with the odd disproportionate composition created by illustrator Harry Peter, produced a comic that was radically ahead of its time in terms of its bold presentation of female power and sexuality. Himself a committed polyamorist, Marston created a universe that was friendly to queer sexualities and lifestyles, from kink to lesbianism to cross-dressing. Written with a deep affection for the fantastically pulpy elements of the early Wonder Womancomics, from invisible jets to giant multi-lunged space kangaroos, the book also reveals how the comic addressed serious, even taboo issues like rape and incest. Wonder Woman: Bondage and Feminism in the Marston/Peter Comics 1941-1948 reveals how illustrator and writer came together to create a unique, visionary work of art, filled with bizarre ambition, revolutionary fervor, and love, far different from the action hero symbol of the feminist movement many of us recall from television.

The Secret History of Wonder Woman

The Secret History of Wonder Woman

Author: Jill Lepore

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780385354059

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 478

Within the origin of one of the world’s most iconic superheroes hides a fascinating family story—and a crucial history of feminism in the twentieth-century. “Everything you might want in a page-turner … skeletons in the closet, a believe-it-or-not weirdness in its biographical details, and something else that secretly powers even the most “serious” feminist history—fun.” —Entertainment Weekly The Secret History of Wonder Woman is a tour de force of intellectual and cultural history. Wonder Woman, Jill Lepore argues, is the missing link in the history of the struggle for women’s rights—a chain of events that begins with the women’s suffrage campaigns of the early 1900s and ends with the troubled place of feminism a century later. Lepore, a Harvard historian and New Yorker staff writer, has uncovered an astonishing trove of documents, including the never-before-seen private papers of Wonder Woman’s creator, William Moulton Marston. The Marston family story is a tale of drama, intrigue, and irony. In the 1920s, Marston and his wife brought into their home Olive Byrne, the niece of Margaret Sanger, one of the most influential feminists of the twentieth century. Even while celebrating conventional family life in a regular column that Marston and Byrne wrote for Family Circle, they themselves pursued lives of extraordinary nonconformity. Marston, internationally known as an expert on truth—he invented the lie detector test—lived a life of secrets, only to spill them on the pages of Wonder Woman. Includes a new afterword with fresh revelations based on never before seen letters and photographs from the Marston family’s papers, and 161 illustrations and 16 pages in full color.

The DC Comics Action Figure Archive

The DC Comics Action Figure Archive

Author: Scott Beatty

Publisher: Chronicle Books

ISBN: 0811858324

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 207

View: 959

Alphabetically organized for easy access and encompassing more than six hundred color photographs, an official visual encyclopedia of more than 1,400 DC Comics action figures features collector's information on release dates, variations, "redecoes," action figure scales, and articulation points. 15,000 first printing.

The Amazing Transforming Superhero!

The Amazing Transforming Superhero!

Author: Terrence R. Wandtke

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786490134

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 254

View: 351

This collection of essays analyzes the many ways in which comic book and film superheroes have been revised or rewritten in response to changes in real-world politics, social mores, and popular culture. Among many topics covered are the jingoistic origin of Captain America in the wake of the McCarthy hearings, the post–World War II fantasy-feminist role of Wonder Woman, and the Nietzschean influences on the “sidekick revolt” in the 2004 film The Incredibles.

Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman

Author: William Messner-Loebs

Publisher: Dc Comics

ISBN: UVA:X030356550

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 120

View: 743

Hippolyta, queen of the Amazons and mother of Wonder Woman, proclaims a new contest to choose a champion who will replace her daughter as the new Wonder Woman.

Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman

Author: Regina Luttrell

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781538153895

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 978

This book looks at Wonder Woman's creation, mysterious identity, and deep roots in the feminist movement, as well as the cultural and psychological impact she has had on five generations of fans, from the Baby Boomers through to today.

Bound by Love

Bound by Love

Author: Laura Mattoon D’Amore

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443831086

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 220

View: 830

What does it mean to be bound by love? Sometimes, the bonds of love supply bliss, and sometimes they demand sacrifice. Sometimes, experiencing love saves people, and sometimes it kills them. Being bound by love often engenders moral responsibility; in other cases, it enslaves and imprisons the soul. American mythologies—especially those presented in film and television—perpetuate love as the central narrative of one’s life; the search for a connection forged by love permeates every facet of human existence, from our desire to be accepted, or our longing to be needed, to our fury at being rejected. Sometimes love is the stuff of happiness, fulfilling in every regard. But there are also times when love makes us do things we should not do; sometimes it turns us into people we do not want to become. The commonality between love that satisfies and love that destroys is the bond between people who open themselves to the vulnerability of love. Examination of the theme of familial bonds in film and television explores how the process of forming and maintaining those bonds complicates, revises, and reproduces ideas about love. The chapters in this book explore how the nature of bonds and familial responsibility inform a popular cultural dialogue about the changing nature of the American family over the past sixty years.