Allied and Axis Signals Intelligence in World War II

Allied and Axis Signals Intelligence in World War II

Author: David Alvarez

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135262570

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 580

The importance of codebreaking and signals intelligence in the diplomacy and military operations of World War II is reflected in this study of the cryptanalysts, not only of the US and Britain, but all the Allies. The codebreaking war was a global conflict in which many countries were active. The contributions reveal that, for the Axis as well as the Allies, success in the signals war often depended upon close collaboration among alliance partners.

Signals Intelligence in World War II

Signals Intelligence in World War II

Author: Donal J. Sexton

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313283048

Category: History

Page: 163

View: 241

In 1974 Frederick W. Winterbotham's book "The Ultra Secret" disclosed the Allied success in breaking the German high command ciphers in World War II, and a new form of history began--the study of intelligence and its impact on military operations and international politics. This guide documents and annotates over 800 sources that have appeared in the past 20 years. It examines and evaluates primary and secondary sources dealing with the role of ULTRA and MAGIC in the Pearl Harbor attack, the battles of the Atlantic, Coral Sea, and Midway, and the campaigns in the Mediterranean, Northwest Europe, the Middle East, and the Pacific, as well as in the realm of espionage and special operations. It also covers sources on the Sigint and cryptanalytic programs of the Axis and neutral powers. The book examines and annotates primary and secondary sources on the role of ULTRA and MAGIC in the Pearl Harbor attack, the battles of the Atlantic, Coral Sea, and Midway, and the campaigns in the Mediterranean, Northwest Europe, the Middle East, and the Pacific, as well as in the realm of espionage and special operations. It also provides details on sources concerned with Sigint and cryptanalytic programs of the Axis and neutral powers.

Allied and Axis Signals Intelligence in World War II

Allied and Axis Signals Intelligence in World War II

Author: David Alvarez

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135262501

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 512

The importance of codebreaking and signals intelligence in the diplomacy and military operations of World War II is reflected in this study of the cryptanalysts, not only of the US and Britain, but all the Allies. The codebreaking war was a global conflict in which many countries were active. The contributions reveal that, for the Axis as well as the Allies, success in the signals war often depended upon close collaboration among alliance partners.

Hitler's Codebreakers

Hitler's Codebreakers

Author: John Jackson

Publisher: Booktowerpublishing

ISBN: 0955716446

Category: World War, 1939-1945

Page: 228

View: 528

Have you ever wondered how successful Hitler's codebreakers were at breaking Allied codes during World War 2? The wartime story of codebreaking has almost exclusively centred around Allied successes, particularly that of Bletchley Park breaking the Enigma code. However, the Germans in particular were extremely active in codebreaking and had their successes. But it was not until after the war that the extent or otherwise of their triumphs could be gauged. With the war in Europe at an end, in April-May 1945 British and American codebreaking teams hunted for their German counterparts to find out just how good they had been. There were lessons to be learned for the post-war period for Western military intelligence. This publication is a summary of the European Axis Signal Intelligence in World War II as revealed by 'TICOM' Investigations and by other Prisoner of War Interrogations and Captured Material, Principally German and completed in May 1946. This is available on the National Security Agency website. TICOM - Target Intelligence Committee - was a shadowy Anglo-American organisation set up in October 1944 whose cover name disguised its real purpose - the seeking out in the immediate aftermath of the war of German Sigint staff for interrogation. This edited volume extracts key data from the 1000 pages of the original documents to create a fascinating and technical insight into German cryptography. The book is a technical summary of the TICOM documents using the words of those who collected the data. The complex data was written for military analysis so the Allies could assess Hitler's codebreaking operation during the war. It becomes clear that Hitler's team understood that the Enigma cipher machine had weaknesses and that they had various ingenious machines either developed or under development as the war drew to a close. Lack of resources - and running out of time - put paid to any major operational deployment of this machinery, but underlines the fact that German ingenuity came close to a situation where they would have made Bletchley Park's task almost impossible. Includes a report on the interrogation of 5 leading Germans in Nuremburg, September 1945 regarding signals intelligence. They are: General Jodl, Grand Admiral Donitz, General Field Marshall Keitel, Herr von Ribbentrop and Field Marshall Goering.

Signals Intelligence of World War Ii

Signals Intelligence of World War Ii

Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: University-Press.org

ISBN: 1230598421

Category:

Page: 60

View: 722

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 58. Chapters: Enigma machine, Bletchley Park, Ultra, Lorenz cipher, Cryptanalysis of the Enigma, Magic, OP-20-G, Station HYPO, Japanese naval codes, Fish, Far East Combined Bureau, Beaumanor Hall, The National Museum of Computing, Siemens and Halske T52, German code breaking in World War II, Station CAST, United States Naval Computing Machine Laboratory, World War II cryptography, PC Bruno, Signals Intelligence Service, Reservehandverfahren, B-Dienst, Wireless Experimental Centre. Excerpt: Cryptanalysis of the Enigma enabled the western Allies in World War II to read substantial amounts of secret Morse-coded radio communications of the Axis powers that had been enciphered using Enigma machines. This yielded military intelligence which, along with that from other decrypted Axis radio and teleprinter transmissions, was given the codename Ultra. This was considered by western Supreme Allied Commander Dwight D. Eisenhower to have been "decisive" to Allied victory in World War II. The Enigma machines were a family of portable cipher machines with rotor scramblers. Good operating procedures, properly enforced, would have made the cipher unbreakable. However, most of the German armed and secret services and civilian agencies that used Enigma employed poor procedures. It was the poor operating procedures that allowed the cipher to be broken. The German plugboard-equipped Enigma that would become the Third Reich's principal crypto-system was reconstructed-with the aid of French-supplied intelligence material that had been obtained from a German spy-by the Polish General Staff's Cipher Bureau in December 1932. From then until the outbreak of World War II, the Poles held a monopoly in decrypting German military Enigma ciphers. In July 1939, as war drew near, the Polish Cipher Bureau initiated the French and British into its...

Military Communications

Military Communications

Author: Christopher H. Sterling

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781851097326

Category: History

Page: 565

View: 663

"Military Communications: From Ancient Times to the 21st Century" is the first comprehensive reference work on the applications of communications technology to military tactics and strategy--a field that is just now coming into its own as a focus of historical study. Ranging from ancient times to the war in Iraq, it offers over 300 alphabetically organized entries covering many methods and modes of transmitting communication through the centuries, as well as key personalities, organizations, strategic applications, and more. "Military Communications" includes examples from armed forces around the world, with a focus on the United States, where many of the most dramatic advances in communications technology and techniques were realized. A number of entries focus on specific battles where communications superiority helped turn the tide, including Tsushima (1905), Tannenberg and the Marne (both 1914), Jutland (1916), and Midway (1942). The book also addresses a range of related topics such as codebreaking, propaganda, and the development of civilian telecommunications.

Secret Messages

Secret Messages

Author: David J. Alvarez

Publisher: Modern War Studies (Hardcover)

ISBN: UOM:39015047710200

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 270

To defeat your enemies you must know them well. In wartime, however, enemy codemakers make that task much more difficult. If you cannot break their codes and read their messages, you may discover too late the enemy's intentions. That's why codebreakers were considered such a crucial weapon during World War II. In Secret Messages, David Alvarez provides the first comprehensive analysis of the impact of decoded radio messages (signals intelligence) upon American foreign policy and strategy from 1930 to 1945. He presents the most complete account to date of the U.S. Army's top-secret Signal Intelligence Service (SIS): its creation, its struggles, its rapid wartime growth, and its contributions to the war effort. Alvarez reveals the inner workings of the SIS (precursor of today's NSA) and the codebreaking process and explains how SIS intercepted, deciphered, and analyzed encoded messages. From its headquarters at Arlington Hall outside Washington, D.C., SIS grew from a staff of four novice codebreakers to more than 10,000 people stationed around the globe, secretly monitoring the communications of not only the Axis powers but dozens of other governments as well and producing a flood of intelligence. Some of the SIS programs were so clandestine that even the White House—unaware of the agency's existence until 1937—was kept uninformed of them, such as the 1943 creation of a super-secret program to break Soviet codes and ciphers. In addition, Alvarez brings to light such previously classified operations as the interception of Vatican communications and a comprehensive program to decrypt the communications of our wartime allies. He also dispels many of the myths about the SIS's influence on American foreign policy, showing that the impact of special intelligence in the diplomatic sphere was limited by the indifference of the White House, constraints within the program itself, and rivalries with other agencies (like the FBI). Drawing upon military and intelligence archives, interviews with retired and active cryptanalysts, and over a million pages of cryptologic documents declassified in 1996, Alvarez illuminates this dark corner of intelligence history and expands our understanding of its role in and contributions to the American effort in World War II.

World War II at Sea

World War II at Sea

Author: Spencer Tucker

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781598844573

Category: History

Page: 751

View: 988

• More than 450 A–Z entries • A comprehensive chronology • Numerous illustrations of individuals, weapons, and battles • Maps • A glossary of naval terms • A comprehensive bibliography, plus cross-references and suggestions for further reading at the end of each entry

World War II: A Student Encyclopedia [5 volumes]

World War II: A Student Encyclopedia [5 volumes]

Author: Spencer C. Tucker

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781851098583

Category: History

Page: 1795

View: 822

Designed with the more visual needs of today's student in mind, this landmark encyclopedia covers the entire scope of the Second World War, from its earliest roots to its continuing impact on global politics and human society. Over 1,000 illustrations, maps, and primary source materials enhance the text and make history come alive for students and faculty alike. ABC-CLIO's World War II: A Student Encyclopedia captures the monumental sweep of the "Big One" with accessible scholarship, a student-friendly, image-rich design, and a variety of tools specifically crafted for the novice researcher. For teachers and curriculum specialists, it is a thoroughly contemporary and authoritative work with everything they need to enrich their syllabi and meet state and national standards. Ranging from the conflict's historic origins to VJ Day and beyond, it brings all aspects of the war vividly to life—its origins in the rubble of World War I, its inevitable outbreak, its succession of tumultuous battles and unforgettable personalities. Students will understand what the war meant to the leaders, the soldiers, and everyday families on home fronts around the world. Featured essays look at Pearl Harbor, the Holocaust, the atomic bomb, and other crucial events, as well as fascinating topics such as signals intelligence and the role of women in war. A separate primary source volume provides essential source material for homework, test preparation or special projects. With a wealth of new information and new ideas about the war's causes, course, and consequences, World War II will be the first place students turn for the who, what, when, where, and—more importantly—the why, behind this historic conflict. 950 A–Z entries, including lengthy biographies of individuals, studies of battles, details of weapons systems, and analyses of wartime conferences—all of the topics students look for, and teachers and educators need to have for their classes Over 270 contributors, including an unprecedented number of non-U.S. authorities, many from Japan and China, giving students a truly global understanding of the war An inviting design incorporating 600 photographs, including contemporaneous images of individuals, scenes from the front lines, posters, and weapon technologies A separate primary source volume offering a wide array of materials ranging from official documents to personal correspondence An early section of 70 detailed geopolitical and military maps, show students the basic sweep of the war

The Western European and Mediterranean Theaters in World War II

The Western European and Mediterranean Theaters in World War II

Author: Donal Sexton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135906870

Category: History

Page: 583

View: 590

The Western European and Mediterranean Theaters in World War II is a concise, comprehensive guide for students, teachers, and history buffs of the Second World War. With an emphasis on the American forces in these theaters, each entry is accompanied by a brief annotation that will allow researchers to navigate through the vast amount of literature on the campaigns fought in these regions with ease. Focusing on all aspects surrounding the U.S. involvement in the Western European and Mediterranean theaters, including politics, religion, biography, strategy, intelligence, and operations, this bibliography will be a welcome addition to the collection of any academic or research library. Routledge Research Guides to American Military Studies provide concise, annotated bibliographies to the major areas and events in American military history. With the inclusion of brief critical annotations after each entry, the student and researcher can easily assess the utility of each bibliographic source and evaluate the abundance of resources available with ease and efficiency. Comprehensive, concise, and current—Routledge Research Guides to American Military Studies are an essential research tool for any historian.

American Foreign Relations Since 1600

American Foreign Relations Since 1600

Author: Robert L. Beisner

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781576070802

Category: History

Page: 2065

View: 639

Chronicles American foreign relations literature from colonial times to the present, with updated material on post World-War II.