Banned History

Banned History

Author: Lynsey Calver

Publisher: Grosvenor House Publishing

ISBN: 9781803812113

Category: History

Page: 340

View: 386

Banned History is all the juicy bits of History which were excluded from your lessons at school. It unashamedly probes into the darker side of some of Britain’s most admired leaders, as well as exploring the hateful and depraved nature of humanity across the last 5000 years. Banned History answers questions which are deliberately avoided by the school curriculum due to the negative light Britain may be portrayed such as the real reason why Britain didn't bomb Auschwitz and how the Transatlantic Slave Trade came into being. Topical issues such as whether Churchill was a racist and how homophobia developed and spread across the world are explored in depth. Concepts which are too horrific to ever feature in the school curriculum are investigated to reveal how many years it takes for incest to wipe out a family; what the most effective method of torture is; and what kind of person tastes best. Written in a bright and breezy tone, Banned History is full of fascinating facts such as who discovered dolphins (and who fell in love with one); why America got involved in the Vietnam war; why Russia turned communist; how Martin Luther King got his name; how many people Europe killed with their colonisation of the Americas; and when and why the British government legalised men hitting their wives. Welcome to the sort of History you definitely didn’t get taught at school.

The History of Hydrogen Bomb and Why It Should Be Banned.

The History of Hydrogen Bomb and Why It Should Be Banned.

Author: John Richard Shanebrook, PhD

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 9781504984850

Category: History

Page: 134

View: 589

One of the first applications of the atomic bomb after Nuclear War I was to serve as the trigger for much more powerful hydrogen bombs. The explosion of an atom bomb emits nuclear radiation, heat energy, and photons. These emissions compress fusion fuel to thermonuclear conditions. From 1945 to 1949, the United States had a monopoly on nuclear weapons until August 29, 1949, when the USSR exploded its first nuclear device. Edward Teller was already actively working on the design of hydrogen bombs, but J. Robert Oppenheimer opposed these efforts. It was President Harry S. Truman who approved the US program to design, build, and test hydrogen bombs. Meanwhile, the USSR had been secretly working on nuclear weapons since 1941, with extensive help from several spies, including Klaus Fuchs. Both the United States and the USSR achieved early success with hydrogen bombs, as was demonstrated by hundreds of test explosions that spread radioactive fallout around the entire Earth. It was the US BRAVO test of a huge hydrogen explosive device on March 1, 1954, that brought matters to a conclusion. The radioactive fallout proved to be lethal over thousands of square miles. The result was an international ban on testing nuclear weapons in the atmosphere (1963). However, the Wizards of Armageddon were busily preparing to fight, and maybe win, future wars fought with hydrogen bombs. These plans included risky maneuvers with live hydrogen bombs on planes, submarines, and other mobile devices. Accidents happened, and many hydrogen bombs were lost, blown apart, or simply abandoned. The absolute worst aspect of hydrogen bomb explosions is global ecocide. The explosions are so powerful they harm the ozone layer and ignite huge fires on Earth that darken the skies. The latter was termed nuclear winter by Carl Sagan. The conclusion of this book is very simple. All hydrogen bombs should be banned, forever

The History of Chinese Buddhist Bibliography: Censorship and Transformation of the Tripitaka

The History of Chinese Buddhist Bibliography: Censorship and Transformation of the Tripitaka

Author: Tanya Storch

Publisher: Cambria Press

ISBN: 9781604978773

Category: Religion

Page: 266

View: 788

"This clearly organized, well-researched book on the medieval catalogs of Buddhist writings in China illuminates the shaky foundations of modern Buddhist research. Storch exposes how the Chinese Buddhist corpus was shaped-and even censored-by generations of catalogers, the guardians of the canon. At the same time, Storch probes the catalogs for what they reveal about standards of authenticity; the assignment of value to some scriptures over others; and the history of books, libraries, and learning in pre-modern China. Moreover, Storch argues convincingly that the history of Chinese Buddhist catalogs should be incorporated into comparative discussions of scripture and canon in world history. As the first general study of Chinese Buddhist bibliography in English by an author who demonstrates a thorough command of the material, this book is the first place scholars should turn to for information about the structure and formation of the Chinese Buddhist canon. This book deserves a place on the bookshelf of every specialist in pre-modern Chinese, Korean, and Japanese Buddhism." - John Kieschnick, Stanford University "This volume brings forward the importance of the cataloging of the many versions of the Chinese Buddhist canon. Given that these compilations are the source for much of the written history of Buddhism in East Asia, they deserve the careful study that has been given to them by Tanya Storch in this book. Her research advances the understanding and provides much new data about this genre of literature and its impact on Chinese religion and culture." - Lewis Lancaster, University of California, Berkeley "Offers insight into wide-ranging issues of how religious ideas are transmitted between cultures. Although the focus here is on the ways in which Buddhism, in both oral and written forms, was assimilated into Chinese literary society, Storch's comparative approach will also be of interest to scholars specializing in the comparative analysis of sacred scriptures." - E. Ann Matter, University of Pennsylvania "Cataloging is an essential step toward canon formation in East Asian Buddhism. However, current scholarship has not yet revealed the mysteries behind the collection of the enormous corpus of Buddhist texts, which is called the Buddhist canon, let alone the process of catalog making. Dr. Storch's work is pioneering in this direction and touches the core of the rich textual tradition in East Asian Buddhism. In addition, her meaningful contribution will be of interest to researchers of a global history of scriptural catalogs because she brings in a comparative perspective to the subject matter and puts the Chinese Buddhist catalogs on a par with the Confucian textual tradition and Western cataloging practices. This book is highly recommended for scholars and students studying Buddhism, history of the Chinese book, and comparative religion." - Jiang Wu, University of Arizona "This highly accessible book is not only helpful to the nonspecialists in Buddhism but also to Buddhist scholars who are interested in how and why differing versions of the Buddhist canon came into existence. Much Buddhist sectarianism stems from different assessments of what should be counted as a reliable Buddhist scripture. This account of the long and complex history of Chinese Buddhist ideas about what should be included in a catalogue of authentic Buddhist scriptures sheds much light on the process of canon formation in Buddhism. It also demonstrates that Chinese Buddhists played a leading role in dividing Buddhism into so-called 'Hinayana' and 'Mahayana,' which is at the root of much Buddhist sectarianism. - Rita M. Gross, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

Russia in World History

Russia in World History

Author: Choi Chatterjee

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350026445

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 768

Russia in World History uses a comparative framework to understand Russian history in a global context. The book challenges the idea of Russia as an outlier of European civilization by examining select themes in modern Russian history alongside cases drawn from the British Empire. Choi Chatterjee analyzes the concepts of nation and empire, selfhood and subjectivity, socialism and capitalism, and revolution and the world order in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. In doing so she rethinks many historical narratives that bluntly posit a liberal West against a repressive, authoritarian Russia. Instead Chatterjee argues for a wider perspective which reveals that imperial practices relating to the appropriation of human and natural resources were shared across European empires, both East and West. Incorporating the stories of famous thinkers, such as Leo Tolstoy, Emma Goldman, Wangari Maathai, Arundhati Roy, among others. This unique interpretation of modern Russia is knitted together from the varied lives and experiences of those individuals who challenged the status quo and promoted a different way of thinking. This is a ground-breaking book with big and provocative ideas about the history of the modern world, and will be vital reading for students of both modern Russian and world history.

History of Fiction in China

History of Fiction in China

Author: Zhi Dao

Publisher: DeepLogic

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 536

The book provides highlights on the key concepts and trends of evolution in History of Fiction in China, as one of the series of books of “China Classified Histories”.

A History of the Cuban Revolution

A History of the Cuban Revolution

Author: Aviva Chomsky

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118942291

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 459

A fully-revised and updated new edition of a concise and insightful socio-historical analysis of the Cuban revolution, and the course it took over five and a half decades. Now available in a fully-revised second edition, including new material to add to the book’s coverage of Cuba over the past decade under Raul Castro All of the existing chapters have been updated to reflect recent scholarship Balances social and historical insight into the revolution with economic and political analysis extending into the twenty-first century Juxtaposes U.S. and Cuban perspectives on the historical impact of the revolution, engaging and debunking the myths and preconceptions surrounding one of the most formative political events of the twentieth century Incorporates more student-friendly features such as a timeline and glossary

Banned

Banned

Author: Frederick Rowe Davis

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300205176

Category: Science

Page: 264

View: 100

"Rachel Carson's seminal book Silent Spring, published in 1962, stands as one of the most important books of the twentieth century. Powerful and eloquent, the book exposed the dangers of indiscriminate chemical pesticide use. It also inspired important and long-lasting changes in environmental science and government policy. In this thought-provoking volume, Frederick Rowe Davis sets Carson's scientific work in the context of the twentieth century, reconsiders her achievement, and analyzes the legacy of her work in the light of toxic chemical use and regulation today. Davis examines the history of pesticide development alongside the evolution of the science of toxicology. He also tracks legislation governing exposure to chemicals from the early 1900s to the end of the century. Against this historical backdrop, the author affirms the brilliance of Carson's careful scientific interpretations drawing on university and government toxicologists. And yet, while Silent Spring instigated legislation that successfully terminated DDT use, other warnings were ignored. Carson and others recognized the extraordinary toxicity of organophosphate insecticides, yet until recently these dominated pesticide markets in the United States and worldwide. In a tragic irony, one poison was replaced with even more dangerous ones. This compelling book urges new thinking about the ways we develop, use, evaluate, and regulate pesticides while taking into account their ecological and human toll."--Jacket.

Stages of History

Stages of History

Author: Phyllis Rackin

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801496985

Category: Drama

Page: 276

View: 623

Phyllis Rackin offers a fresh approach to Shakespeare's English history plays, rereading them in the context of a world where rapid cultural change transformed historical consciousness and gave the study of history a new urgency. Rackin situates Shakespeare's English chronicles among multiple discourses, particularly the controversies surrounding the functions of poetry, theater, and history. She focuses on areas of contention in Renaissance historiography that are also areas of concern in recent criticism-historical authority and causation, the problems of anachronism and nostalgia, and the historical construction of class and gender. She analyzes the ways in which the perfoace of history in Shakespeare's theater participated--and its representation in subsequent criticism still participates--in the contests between opposed theories of history and between the different ideological interests and historiographic practices they authorize. Celebrating the heroic struggles of the past and recording the patriarchal genealogies of kings and nobles, Tudor historians provided an implicit rationale for the hierarchical order of their own time; but the new public theater where socially heterogeneous audiences came together to watch common players enact the roles of their social superiors was widely perceived as subverting that order. Examining such sociohistorical factors as the roles of women and common men and the conditions of theatrical performance, Rackin explores what happened when elite historical discourse was trans porteto the public commercial theater. She argues that Shakespeare's chronicles transformed univocal historical writing into polyphonic theatrical scripts that expressed the contradictions of Elizabethan culture.

Public History

Public History

Author: Faye Sayer

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472514653

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 821

Public History: A Practical Guide explores history in the public sphere and examines the variety of skills that historians require in the practice of public history. It discusses how through various mediums of interpretation and presentation a range of actors, which include museums, archives, government agencies, community history societies and the media and digital media, make history accessible to a wider audience. It provides the reader with an overview of the wider-world application and communication of history beyond the classroom through core case studies for each sector that include ideas for best practice 'in the field'. This book offers an accessible and engaging synopsis of a topic that has not previously been covered. By focusing on an area of study that has changed substantially in the last decade, Public History: A Practical Guide presents a comprehensive outline of the practice of 'public history', and provides ideas for future methodological approaches as well as a reference point for planning professional development in order to gain future employment in these sectors. In the current economic climate, students need to understand the potential use of history beyond university; this book contains the tools and advice needed for them to get one step ahead in terms of knowledge, skills and experience.