Ending Africa's Energy Deficit and the Law

Ending Africa's Energy Deficit and the Law

Author: Yinka Omorogbe

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198819837

Category:

Page: 432

View: 283

The need for energy might be universal, but access to it is not. Omorogbe and Ordor bring together experts in their field to ask how corruption and limited regulation have stalled progress in Africa, examining the impact on disabled people, women, and children, and its relation to environmental and humanitarian concerns.

Ending Africa's Energy Deficit and the Law

Ending Africa's Energy Deficit and the Law

Author: Yinka Omorogbe

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192551726

Category: Law

Page: 431

View: 740

With the inclusion of access to energy in the sustainable development goals, the role of energy to human existence was finally recognized. Yet, in Africa, this achievement is far from realized. Omorogbe and Ordor bring together experts in their fields to ask what is stalling progress, examining problems from institutions catering to vested interests at the continent's expense, to a need to develop vigorous financial and fiscal frameworks. The ramifications and complications of energy law are labyrinthine: this volume discusses how energy deficits can burden disabled people, women, and children in excess of their more fortunate counterparts, as well as considering environmental issues, including the delicate balance between the necessity of water for drinking and cleaning and the use of water in industrial processes. A pivotal work of scholarship, the book poses pressing questions for energy law and international human rights.

Energy Justice and Energy Law

Energy Justice and Energy Law

Author: Iñigo del Guayo

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198860754

Category: Law

Page: 384

View: 812

Energy justice has emerged over the last decade as a matter of vital concern in energy law, which can be seen in the attention directed to energy poverty, and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. There are energy justice concerns in areas of law as diverse as human rights, consumer protection, international law and trade, and in many forms of regional and national energy law and regulation. This edited collection explores in detail at four kinds of energy justice. The first, distributive justice, relates to the equitable distribution of the benefits and burdens of energy activities, which is challenged by the existence of people suffering from energy poverty. Secondly, procedural (or participation) justice consists of the right of all communities to participate in decision-making regarding energy projects and policies that affect them. This dimension of energy justice often includes procedural rights to information and access to courts. Under the concept of reparation (or restorative) justice, the book looks at even-handed enforcement of energy statutes and regulations, as well as access to remedies when legal rights are violated. Finally, the collection addresses social justice, with the recognition that energy injustice cannot be separated from other social ills, such as poverty and subordination based on race, gender, or indigeneity. These issues feed into a wider conversation about how we achieve a 'just' energy transition, as the world confronts the urgent challenges of climate change.

Energy Transitions and the Future of the African Energy Sector

Energy Transitions and the Future of the African Energy Sector

Author: Victoria R. Nalule

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030568498

Category: Political Science

Page: 477

View: 236

This book explores current developments in the African energy sector and highlights how these are likely to be affected by the ongoing global efforts to transition to a low-carbon economy. It analyses the legal, regulatory and policy frameworks at the national and regional level as they relate to Energy transition in Africa and discusses how regionalism is increasingly utilized to tackle energy access and climate change challenges. Using case studies from across the continent, several key thematic issues, including gender justice, social license to operate, local content and conflict of energy laws are covered in detail. The authors also uniquely examine the progressive nature of global energy use and introduce the new concept of ‘Energy Progression.’ This book will be an invaluable reference for researchers and policymakers looking for a comprehensive overview of the field.

Implementing Business and Human Rights Norms in Africa: Law and Policy Interventions

Implementing Business and Human Rights Norms in Africa: Law and Policy Interventions

Author: Oyeniyi Abe

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000588217

Category: Law

Page: 216

View: 659

This book examines the contemporary and contentious question of the critical connections between business and human rights, and the implementation of socially responsible norms in developing countries, with particular reference to Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa. Business enterprises and transnational corporate actors operate in a complex global environment, especially when operating in high risks sectors such as oil and gas, mining, construction, banking, and health care amongst others. Understanding human rights responsibilities, impacts and socially responsible behaviour for companies is therefore an essential component of corporate risk management in our current world. The release of the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, an instrument consisting of 31 principles on this issue, has further underscored the emergence of a rapidly developing set of international law norms on human rights responsibilities of businesses and transnational corporations. It has also shaped the discourse on corporate accountability for human rights. In addition to minimizing litigation, financial and reputational risks, understanding and demonstrating corporate respect for human rights is vital to building a culture of trust and integrity amongst local communities, investors, and shareholders. While Africa has been at the receiving end of deleterious activities of corporate actors, it has failed to address corporate impunity and human rights violations by non-state actors. Questions abound revolving around the underpinnings of a corporate responsibility to respect human rights, that is, how non-western and particularly African conceptions of respect may help develop a ‘beyond do no harm’ approach to respect; policy discourses on human rights due diligence, human rights impact assessment; mandating corporate respect for human rights in both domestic and international law. This book examines, clarifies, and unpacks the guiding principles of a rights-based approach to development and social inclusion. It offers an excellent exposition of regulatory capacity, institutional efficacy and democratic legitimacy of governance institutions that shape development including a comprehensive analysis of how states are shaping business and human rights discourses locally to develop a critical understanding of identified issues by exploring the latest theories through comparative lenses

Resilience in Energy, Infrastructure, and Natural Resources Law

Resilience in Energy, Infrastructure, and Natural Resources Law

Author: Catherine Banet

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192864574

Category:

Page: 400

View: 412

Through a mix of thematic chapters and case studies, this book offers an analytical approach to developing legal responses which will ensure the needs of present and future generations can be met through energy systems, infrastructure development, and natural resources management in times of increasingly frequent and disruptive nature-based events.

Public-Private Partnerships in Emerging Economies

Public-Private Partnerships in Emerging Economies

Author: Augustine Edobor Arimoro

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000215533

Category: Law

Page: 228

View: 333

Over the years, a shortage of funds has resulted in a huge deficit in government budgets for infrastructure, especially in developing economies. It is no longer feasible for governments to bear the entire burden of funding public infrastructure. Given that an inadequate supply of public infrastructure poses a challenge for the economic development of any country, partnerships with the private sector to fund public infrastructure procurement has started to be relied on as an alternative to traditional public procurement. Public-Private Partnerships are an arrangement that allow private entities to fund, design, manage and operate public infrastructure for a term in exchange for the payment of tolls by users or the government may well be the solution to the infrastructure crisis in many developing economies. This book examines the role of law in the adoption, implementation and regulation of Public-Private Partnership in selected developing economies including Brazil, India, Nigeria and South Africa to address how to deal with overlapping laws and how the law can protect assets invested in PPP in order to attract private sector interests in infrastructure financing in developing market, showing how law can be used to create, sustain and promote PPP frameworks that take into account local circumstances in developing economies.