English Catholics and the Education of the Poor, 1847–1902

English Catholics and the Education of the Poor, 1847–1902

Author: Eric G Tenbus

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317323891

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 456

Filling an important gap in the historiography of Victorian Britain, this book examines the English Catholic Church's efforts during the second half of the nineteenth century to provide elementary education for Catholics.

English Catholics and the Education of the Poor, 1847-1902

English Catholics and the Education of the Poor, 1847-1902

Author: Eric G. Tenbus

Publisher:

ISBN: 1138661295

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 885

Filling an important gap in the historiography of Victorian Britain, this book examines the English Catholic Church's efforts during the second half of the nineteenth century to provide elementary education for Catholics.

The Great Church Crisis and the End of English Erastianism, 1898-1906

The Great Church Crisis and the End of English Erastianism, 1898-1906

Author: Bethany Kilcrease

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317029915

Category: History

Page: 222

View: 811

This book traces the history of the "Church Crisis", a conflict between the Protestant and Anglo-Catholic (Ritualist) parties within the Church of England between 1898 and 1906. During this period, increasing numbers of Britons embraced Anglo-Catholicism and even converted to Roman Catholicism. Consequent fears that Catholicism was undermining the "Protestant" heritage of the established church led to a moral panic. The Crisis led to a temporary revival of Erastianism as protestant groups sought to stamp out Catholicism within the established church through legislation whilst Anglo-Catholics, who valued ecclesiastical autonomy, opposed any such attempts. The eventual victory of forces in favor of greater ecclesiastical autonomy ended parliamentary attempts to control church practice, sounding the death knell of Erastianism. Despite increased acknowledgment that religious concerns remained deep-seated around the turn of the century, historians have failed to recognize that this period witnessed a high point in Protestant-Catholic antagonism and a shift in the relationship between the established church and Parliament. Parliament’s increasing unwillingness to address ecclesiastical concerns in this period was not an example advancing political secularity. Rather, Parliament’s increased reluctance to engage with the Church of England illustrates the triumph of an anti-Erastian conception of church-state relations.

Women and Religion in the Atlantic Age, 1550-1900

Women and Religion in the Atlantic Age, 1550-1900

Author: Emily Clark

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134773039

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 290

Bringing the study of early modern Christianity into dialogue with Atlantic history, this collection provides a longue durée investigation of women and religion within a transatlantic context. Taking as its starting point the work of Natalie Zemon Davis on the effects of confessional difference among women in the age of religious reformations, the volume expands the focus to broader temporal and geographic boundaries. The result is a series of essays examining the effects of religious reform and revival among women in the wider Atlantic world of Europe, the Americas, and West Africa from 1550 to 1850. Taken collectively, the essays in this volume chart the extended impact of confessional divergence on women over time and space, and uncover a web of transatlantic religious interaction that significantly enriches our understanding of the unfolding of the Atlantic World. Divided into three sections, the volume begins with an exploration of ’Old World Reforms’ looking afresh at the impact of confessional change in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries upon the lives of European women. Part two takes this forward, tracing the adaptation of European religious forms within Africa and the Americas. The third and final section explores the multifarious faces of the revival that inspired the nineteenth century missionary movement on both sides of the Atlantic. Collectively the essays underline the extent to which the development of the Atlantic World created a space within which an unprecedented series of juxtapositions, collisions, and collusions among religious traditions and practitioners took place. These demonstrate how the religious history of Europe, the Americas, and Africa became intertwined earlier and more deeply than much scholarship suggests, and highlight the dynamic nature of transatlantic cross-fertilization and influence.

Faith in the family

Faith in the family

Author: Alana Harris

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9781526102447

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 771

Drawing upon a multi-disciplinary methodology employing diverse written sources, material practices and vivid life histories, Faith in the family seeks to assess the impact of the Second Vatican Council on the ordinary believer, alongside contemporaneous shifts in British society relating to social mobility, the sixties, sexual morality and secularisation. Chapters examine the changes in the Roman Catholic liturgy and Christology; devotion to Mary, the rosary and the place of women in the family and church, as well as the enduring (but shifting) popularity of Saints Bernadette and Thérèse. Appealing to students of modern British gender and cultural history, as well as a general readership interested in religious life in Britain in the second half of the twentieth century, Faith in the family illustrates that despite unmistakable differences in their cultural accoutrements and interpretations of Catholicism, English Catholics continued to identify with and practise the ‘Faith of Our Fathers’ before and after Vatican II.

Socialism and the Diasporic ‘Other’

Socialism and the Diasporic ‘Other’

Author: Daniel Renshaw

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: 9781786948755

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 733

Socialism and the Diasporic ‘Other’ examines the relationship between the London-based Left and Irish and Jewish communities in the East End between 1889 and 1912. Using a comparative framework, it examines the varied interactions between working class diasporic groups, conservative communal hierarchies and revolutionary and trade union organisations.

Respectability and the London Poor, 1780–1870

Respectability and the London Poor, 1780–1870

Author: Lynn MacKay

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317321439

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 240

View: 986

The population of London soared during the Industrial Revolution and the poorer areas became iconic places of overcrowding and vice. Focusing on the communities of Westminster, MacKay shows that many of the plebeian populace retained traditional working-class pursuits, such as gambling, drinking and blood sports.

A History of Drink and the English, 1500-2000

A History of Drink and the English, 1500-2000

Author: Paul Jennings

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317209171

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 230

View: 105

A 2017 CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title award winner *********************************************** This book is an introduction to the history of alcoholic drink in England from the end of the Middle Ages to the present day. Treating the subject thematically, it covers who drank, what they drank, how much, who produced and sold drink, the places where it was enjoyed and the meanings which drinking had for people. It also looks at the varied opposition to drinking and the ways in which it has been regulated and policed. As a social and cultural history, it examines the place of drink in society and how social developments have affected its history and what it meant to individuals and groups as a cultural practice. Covering an extended period in time, this book takes in the important changes brought about by the Reformation and the processes of industrialization and urbanization. This volume also focuses on drink in relation to class and gender and the importance of global developments, along with the significance of regional and local difference. Whilst a work of history, it draws upon the insights of a range of other disciplines which have together advanced our understanding of alcohol. The focus is England, but it acknowledges the importance of comparison with the experience of other countries in furthering our understanding of England’s particular experience. This book argues for the centrality of drink in English society throughout the period under consideration, whilst emphasizing the ways in which its use, abuse and how they have been experienced and perceived have changed at different historical moments. It is the first scholarly work which covers the history of drink in England in all its aspects over such an extended period of time. Written in a lively and approachable style, this book is suitable for those who study social and cultural history, as well as those with an interest in the history of drink in England.

Religious Vitality in Victorian London

Religious Vitality in Victorian London

Author: W. M. Jacob

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192651747

Category: Religion

Page: 361

View: 187

This innovative book challenges many of the widely held assumptions about the place of religion in Victorian society and in London, the world's first great industrial and commercial metropolis. Against the background of Victorian London it explores the religiosity of Londoners as expressed through the dynamic renewal of traditional faith communities, including Judaism and the historic churches, as well as fresh expressions of religion, including the Salvation Army, Mormons, spiritualism, and the occult. It shows how laypeople, especially the rich and women were mobilised in the service of their faith, and their fellow citizens. Drawing on research in social, economic, oral, cultural, and women's history Jacob argues that religious motivations lay behind concerns that subsequently preoccupied people in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. These include the changing place of women in society, an active concern for social justice, the sexual exploitation of women and children, and provision of education for all classes and all ages. By examining religion broadly, in its social and cultural context and looking beyond conventional approaches to religious history, Religious Vitality in Victorian London illustrates the dynamic significance of religion in society influencing even the expression of secularism.

Religion in Victorian London

Religion in Victorian London

Author: William M. Jacob

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192897404

Category: History

Page: 361

View: 616

This innovative book challenges many of the widely held assumptions about the place of religion in Victorian society and in London, the world's first great industrial and commercial metropolis. Against the background of Victorian London it explores the religiosity of Londoners as expressed through the dynamic renewal of traditional faith communities, including Judaism and the historic churches, as well as fresh expressions of religion, including the Salvation Army, Mormons, spiritualism, and the occult. It shows how laypeople, especially the rich and women were mobilised in the service of their faith, and their fellow citizens. Drawing on research in social, economic, oral, cultural, and women's history Jacob argues that religious motivations lay behind concerns that subsequently preoccupied people in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. These include the changing place of women in society, an active concern for social justice, the sexual exploitation of women and children, and provision of education for all classes and all ages. By examining religion broadly, in its social and cultural context and looking beyond conventional approaches to religious history, Religious Vitality in Victorian London illustrates the dynamic significance of religion in society influencing even the expression of secularism.

Faith Schools, Tolerance and Diversity

Faith Schools, Tolerance and Diversity

Author: Helen Everett

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319695662

Category: Religion

Page: 387

View: 123

This book examines the effects of faith schools on social cohesion and inter-ethnic relations. Faith schools constitute approximately one third of all state-maintained schools and two fifths of the independent schools in England. Nevertheless, they have historically been, and remain, controversial. In the current social climate, questions have been raised about the ability of faith schools to promote Community Cohesion and, included within that, their ability to promote tolerance. This book explores one aspect of the debate by examining the effect that faith schools have on their students’ attitudes of tolerance. As well as asking what differences exist between students in faith and non-faith schools, it also looks at which aspects of the schools might be affecting the students and their attitudes towards different minorities. The book is a must-read for students and researchers in the fields of education and religious studies, as well as anyone with an interest in the place of faith schools in a modern multicultural society.

Space, Place and Gendered Identities

Space, Place and Gendered Identities

Author: Kathryne Beebe

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317569565

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 547

In the last two decades, historians have increasingly sought to understand how environments, ‘built’ and otherwise, architectural surroundings, landscapes, and conceptual ‘places’ and ‘spaces’ have affected the nature and scope of political power, cultural production and social experience . The essays in this collection expand upon this already rich field of inquiry by combining an analytical approach sensitive to questions of gender with an exploration of ideas of political space. The volume demonstrates how the gendered and political meanings of space—be that space domestic or public, rural or urban, real or imagined, or a combination of all these and more—are fashioned through the movement of historical actors through space and time. Whether in delineating the gendered and politicized space of the pulpit; the sickroom; the Irish farmyard; the London suffrage atelier; the domestic space created by the wireless; the lesbian ‘scene’ of rural Canada; the eighteenth-century ladies' ‘closet’; or the public space within the ‘public history’ of historic houses, the volume demonstrates how the meanings of these spaces are not fixed, but are challenged and reformulated. This book was originally published as a special issue of women’s History Review.