Gendering Global Humanitarianism in the Twentieth Century

Gendering Global Humanitarianism in the Twentieth Century

Author: Esther Möller

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030446307

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 202

“This volume is interesting both because of its global focus, and its chronology up to the present, it covers a good century of changes. It will help define the field of gender studies of humanitarianism, and its relevance for understanding the history of nation-building, and a political history that goes beyond nations.” - Glenda Sluga, Professor of International History and ARC Kathleen Laureate Fellow at the University of Sydney, Australia This volume discusses the relationship between gender and humanitarian discourses and practices in the twentieth century. It analyses the ways in which constructions, norms and ideologies of gender both shaped and were shaped in global humanitarian contexts. The individual chapters present issues such as post-genocide relief and rehabilitation, humanitarian careers and subjectivities, medical assistance, community aid, child welfare and child soldiering. They give prominence to the beneficiaries of aid and their use of humanitarian resources, organizations and structures by investigating the effects of humanitarian activities on gender relations in the respective societies. Approaching humanitarianism as a global phenomenon, the volume considers actors and theoretical positions from the global North and South (from Europe to the Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa, South and South East Asia as well as North America). It combines state and non-state humanitarian initiatives and scrutinizes their gendered dimension on local, regional, national and global scales. Focusing on the time between the late nineteenth century and the post-Cold War era, the volume concentrates on a period that not only witnessed a major expansion of humanitarian action worldwide but also saw fundamental changes in gender relations and the gradual emergence of gender-sensitive policies in humanitarian organizations in many Western and non-Western settings.

The Humanitarians

The Humanitarians

Author: Joy Damousi

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108996341

Category: History

Page: 363

View: 847

Spanning six decades from the formation of the Save the Children Fund in 1919 to humanitarian interventions during the Vietnam War, The Humanitarians maps the national and international humanitarian efforts undertaken by Australians on behalf of child refugees. In this longitudinal study, Joy Damousi explores the shifting forms of humanitarian activity related to war refugee children over the twentieth century, from child sponsorship, the establishment of orphanages, fundraising, to aid and development schemes and campaigns for inter-country adoption. Framed by conceptualisations of the history of emotions, and the limits and possibilities afforded by empathy and compassion, she considers the vital role of women and includes studies of unknown, but significant, women humanitarian workers and their often-traumatic experience of international humanitarian work. Through an examination of the intersection between racial politics and war refugees, Damousi advances our understanding of humanitarianism over the twentieth century as a deeply racialised and multi-layered practice.

Night on Earth

Night on Earth

Author: Davide Rodogno

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108498913

Category: History

Page: 420

View: 742

Reveals how international 'relief' and 'development' became intertwined in humanitarian programs in the Near East from 1918 to 1930.

Cultural Sovereignty beyond the Modern State

Cultural Sovereignty beyond the Modern State

Author: Gregor Feindt

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110679250

Category: History

Page: 187

View: 226

Gegründet im Jahr 2000 widmet sich das Jahrbuch der Europäischen Geschichte von der Frühen Neuzeit bis zur jüngeren Zeitgeschichte. Die große zeitliche Breite, thematische Vielfalt und methodische Offenheit zeichnen das Jahrbuch von Beginn an aus und machen es zu einem zentralen Ort wissenschaftlicher Debatten. Das bleibt künftig so. Mit dem Jahrgang 2014 verändert sich das Jahrbuch aber in mehrfacher Hinsicht: Das Jahrbuch erscheint mit der Ausgabe 2014 im Open Access. Jeder Band setzt einen thematischen Schwerpunkt. Das Forum bietet Platz für geschichtswissenschaftliche Reflexionen und Debatten. Jeder Beitrag des Jahrbuchs durchläuft ein strenges Peer-Review-Verfahren. Das Jahrbuch erweitert seinen Namen zum "Jahrbuch für Europäische Geschichte. European History Yearbook". und druckt künftig deutsch- und englischsprachige Beiträge, seit 2015 ausschließlich englischsprachige.

The Egyptian Revolution of 1919

The Egyptian Revolution of 1919

Author: H.A Hellyer

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780755643622

Category: Political Science

Page: 232

View: 493

The 1919 Egyptian revolution was the founding event for modern Egypt's nation state. So far there has been no text that looks at the causes, consequences and legacies of the 1919 Egyptian Revolution. This book addresses that gap, with Egyptian and non-Egyptian scholars discussing a range of topics that link back to that crucial event in Egyptian history. Across nine chapters, the book analyzes the causes and course of the 1919 revolution; its impacts on subsequent political beliefs, practices and institutions; and its continuing legacy as a means of regime legitimation. The chapters reveal that the 1919 Egyptian Revolution divided the British while uniting Egyptians. However, the “revolutionary moment” was superseded by efforts to restore Britain's influence in league with a reassertion of monarchical authority. Those efforts enjoyed tactical, but not long-term strategic success, in part because the 1919 revolution had unleashed nationalist forces that could never again be completely contained. The book covers key issues surrounding the 1919 Egyptian Revolution such as the role played by Lord Allenby; internal schisms within the British government struggling to cope with the revolution; Muslim-Christian relations; and divisions among the Egyptians.

Buried in the Red Dirt

Buried in the Red Dirt

Author: Frances S. Hasso

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316513545

Category: History

Page: 303

View: 508

A vivid account of Palestinian life, death, and reproduction during and since the British colonial period in Palestine.

The Oxford Handbook of Gender, War, and the Western World Since 1600

The Oxford Handbook of Gender, War, and the Western World Since 1600

Author: Karen Hagemann

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199948710

Category: History

Page: 848

View: 99

To date, war history has focused predominantly on the efforts of and impact of war on male participants. However, this limited focus disregards the complexity of gendered experiences with war and the military. The Oxford Handbook of Gender, War, and the Western World since 1600 investigates how conceptions of gender have contributed to the shaping of military culture, examining the varied ideals and practices that have socially differentiated men and women'swartime experiences. Covering the major periods in warfare since the seventeenth century, The Handbook explores cultural representations of war and the interconnectedness of the military with civil society and its transformations.

Genocide and Gender in the Twentieth Century

Genocide and Gender in the Twentieth Century

Author: Amy E. Randall

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350111035

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 454

Focusing on events in Rwanda, Armenia, and the former Yugoslavia as well as the Holocaust, Genocide and Gender in the Twentieth Century investigates how historically- and culturally-specific ideas led to genocidal sexual violence. Expert contributors also consider how these ideas, in conjunction with issues relating to femininity, masculinity and understandings of gendered identities, contributed to perpetrators' tools and strategies for ethnic cleansing and genocide. The 2nd edition features: * Five brand new chapters which explore: imperialism, race, gender and genocide; the Cambodian genocide; memory and intergenerational transmission of Holocaust trauma; and genocide, gender and memory in the Armenian case. * An extended and enhanced introduction which makes use of recent scholarship on gender and violence. * Historiographical and bibliographical updates throughout. * Key primary document - excerpt from the 1948 UN Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of Genocide. Updated and revised in its second edition, Genocide and Gender in the Twentieth Century is the authoritative study on the complex gender dimensions of ethnic cleansing and genocide in the 20th century.

Women and Gender in International History

Women and Gender in International History

Author: Karen Garner

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472576149

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 839

Most governments and global political organizations have been dominated by male leaders and structures that institutionalize male privilege. As Women and Gender in International History reveals, however, women have participated in and influenced the traditional concerns of international history even as they have expanded those concerns in new directions. Karen Garner provides a timely synthesis of key scholarship and establishes the influential roles that women and gender power relations have wielded in determining the course of international history. From the early-20th century onward, women have participated in state-to-state relations and decisions about when to pursue diplomacy or when to go to war to settle international conflicts. Particular women, as well as masculine and feminine gender role constructs, have also influenced the establishment and evolution of intergovernmental organizations and their political, social and economic policy making regimes and agencies. Additionally, feminists have critiqued male-dominated diplomatic establishment and intergovernmental organizations and have proposed alternative theories and practices. This text integrates women, and gender and feminist analyses, into the study of international history in order to produce a broader understanding of processes of international change during the 20th and 21st centuries.

Rotary International and the Selling of American Capitalism

Rotary International and the Selling of American Capitalism

Author: Brendan Goff

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674259119

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 621

A new history of Rotary International shows how the organization reinforced capitalist values and cultural practices at home and tried to remake the world in the idealized image of Main Street America. Rotary International was born in Chicago in 1905. By the time World War II was over, the organization had made good on its promise to “girdle the globe.” Rotary International and the Selling of American Capitalism explores the meteoric rise of a local service club that brought missionary zeal to the spread of American-style economics and civic ideals. Brendan Goff traces Rotary’s ideological roots to the business progressivism and cultural internationalism of the United States in the early twentieth century. The key idea was that community service was intrinsic to a capitalist way of life. The tone of “service above self” was often religious, but, as Rotary looked abroad, it embraced Woodrow Wilson’s secular message of collective security and international cooperation: civic internationalism was the businessman’s version of the Christian imperial civilizing mission, performed outside the state apparatus. The target of this mission was both domestic and global. The Rotarian, the organization’s publication, encouraged Americans to see the world as friendly to Main Street values, and Rotary worked with US corporations to export those values. Case studies of Rotary activities in Tokyo and Havana show the group paving the way for encroachments of US power—economic, political, and cultural—during the interwar years. Rotary’s evangelism on behalf of market-friendly philanthropy and volunteerism reflected a genuine belief in peacemaking through the world’s “parliament of businessmen.” But, as Goff makes clear, Rotary also reinforced American power and interests, demonstrating the tension at the core of US-led internationalism.

Border Humanitarians

Border Humanitarians

Author: Adam Saltsman

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815655602

Category: Social Science

Page: 284

View: 212

In rich ethnographic detail, Border Humanitarians explores the narratives of Burmese activists in exile who rely on transnational political and social networks to respond to gender violence among the hundreds of thousands of migrants living and working precariously on the Thai border with Myanmar. The activists this book follows must navigate a multiplicity of representations; they are simultaneously "illegal" in Thailand, underpaid feminized laborers in a global garment supply chain, and targets of global North humanitarian intervention with funding to "rescue" and "empower" them. Looking at how these multiple roles overlap, Saltsman asks how state border enforcement regimes, global humanitarianism, and neoliberal capitalist trajectories produce varied sets of constraints and opportunities in migrants’ lives. Here, like in many spaces that are simultaneously zones of refuge and hubs for flexible labor, the borderlands are both a site of dispossession for migrants as well as a resource for collective agency. As Saltsman details, gender itself emerges as an important tool for migrants and aid workers alike to navigate insecurity and assert varying ways of making order amidst the upheaval of displacement and ongoing exclusion.

Humanitarianism, War, and Politics

Humanitarianism, War, and Politics

Author: Peter J. Hoffman

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442266148

Category: Political Science

Page: 344

View: 341

What is humanitarianism? This authoritative book provides a comprehensive analysis of the original idea and its evolution, exploring its triangulation with war and politics. Peter J. Hoffman and Thomas G. Weiss trace the origins of humanitarianism, its social movement, and the institutions (international humanitarian law) and organizations (providers of assistance and protection) that comprise it. They consider the international humanitarian system’s ability to regulate the conduct of war, to improve the wellbeing of its victims, and to prosecute war criminals. Probing the profound changes in the culture and capacities that underpin the sector and alter the meaning of humanitarianism, they assess the reinventions that constitute “revolutions in humanitarian affairs.” The book begins with traditions and perspectives—ranging from classic international relations approaches to “Critical Humanitarian Studies” —and reviews seminal wartime emergencies and the creation and development of humanitarian agencies in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The authors then examine the rise of “new humanitarianisms” after the Cold War’s end and contemporary cases after 9/11. The authors continue by unpacking the most recent “revolutions”—the International Criminal Court and the “Responsibility to Protect”—as well as such core challenges as displacement camps, infectious diseases, eco-refugees, and marketization. They conclude by evaluating the contemporary system and the prospects for further transformations, identifying scholarly puzzles and the acute operational problems faced by practitioners.