Hitler's True Believers

Hitler's True Believers

Author: Robert Gellately

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780190689902

Category: BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY

Page: 465

View: 116

Nazi ideology drove Hitler's quest for power in 1933, colored everything in the Third Reich, and culminated in the Second World War and the Holocaust. In this book, Gellately addresses often-debated questions about how Führer discovered the ideology and why millions adopted aspects of National Socialism without having laid eyes on the "leader" or reading his work.

Hitler's True Believers

Hitler's True Believers

Author: Robert Gellately

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190689926

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 132

Understanding Adolf Hitler's ideology provides insights into the mental world of an extremist politics that, over the course of the Third Reich, developed explosive energies culminating in the Second World War and the Holocaust. Too often the theories underlying National Socialism or Nazism are dismissed as an irrational hodge-podge of ideas. Yet that ideology drove Hitler's quest for power in 1933, colored everything in the Third Reich, and transformed him, however briefly, into the most powerful leader in the world. How did he discover that ideology? How was it that cohorts of leaders, followers, and ordinary citizens adopted aspects of National Socialism without experiencing the "leader" first-hand or reading his works? They shared a collective desire to create a harmonious, racially select, "community of the people" to build on Germany's socialist-oriented political culture and to seek national renewal. If we wish to understand the rise of the Nazi Party and the new dictatorship's remarkable staying power, we have to take the nationalist and socialist aspects of this ideology seriously. Hitler became a kind of representative figure for ideas, emotions, and aims that he shared with thousands, and eventually millions, of true believers who were of like mind . They projected onto him the properties of the "necessary leader," a commanding figure at the head of a uniformed corps that would rally the masses and storm the barricades. It remains remarkable that millions of people in a well-educated and cultured nation eventually came to accept or accommodate themselves to the tenants of an extremist ideology laced with hatred and laden with such obvious murderous implications.

God-botherers and Other True Believers

God-botherers and Other True Believers

Author: Frederick George Bailey

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1845455126

Category: Political Science

Page: 252

View: 988

When reason fails to guide us in our everyday lives, we turn to faith, to religion; we close our minds; we reject austere reasoning. This rejection, which is a faith-based social and intellectual malignancy, has two unfortunate consequences: it blocks the way to knowledge that might enhance the quality of life and it opens the way to charlatans who exploit the faith of others. Examining two unquestionable malignancies of "the Christian Right" in present-day politics in the United States and the "secular religion" of Hitler's National Socialism, as well as the third, more complex case of Gandhi, the author asserts that we need religion, but we also need to make sure it does no harm.

Hitler's Police Battalions

Hitler's Police Battalions

Author: Edward B. Westermann

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015060814814

Category: History

Page: 329

View: 780

When the German Wehrmacht swarmed across Eastern Europe, an elite corps followed close at its heels. Along with the SS and Gestapo, the Ordnungspolizei, or Uniformed Police, played a central role in Nazi genocide that until now has been generally neglected by historians of the war. Beginning with the invasion of Poland, the Uniformed Police were charged with following the army to curb resistance, pacify the countryside, patrol Jewish ghettos, and generally maintain order in the conquered territories. Edward Westermann examines how this force emerged as a primary instrument of annihilation, responsible for the murder of hundreds of thousands of the Third Reich's political and racial enemies. In Hitler's Police Battalions he reveals how the institutional mindset of these "ordinary policemen" allowed them to commit atrocities without a second thought. To uncover the story of how the German national police were fashioned into a corps of political soldiers, Westermann reveals initiatives pursued before the war by Heinrich Himmler and Kurt Daluege to create a culture within the existing police forces that fostered anti-Semitism and anti-Communism as institutional norms. Challenging prevailing interpretations of German culture, Westermann draws on extensive archival research—including the testimony of former policemen—to illuminate this transformation and the callous organizational culture that emerged. Purged of dissidents, indoctrinated to idolize Hitler, and trained in military combat, these police battalions-often numbering several hundred men-repeatedly conducted actions against Jews, Slavs, gypsies, asocials, and other groups on their own initiative, even when they had the choice not to. In addition to documenting these atrocities, Westermann examines cooperation between the Ordnungspolizei and the SS and Gestapo, and the close relationship between police and Wehrmacht in the conduct of the anti-partisan campaign of annihilation. Throughout, Westermann stresses the importance of ideological indoctrination and organizational initiatives within specific groups. It was the organizational culture of the Uniformed Police, he maintains, and not German culture in general that led these men to commit genocide. Hitler's Police Battalions provides the most complete and comprehensive study to date of this neglected branch of Himmler's SS and Police empire and adds a new dimension to our understanding of the Holocaust and the war on the Eastern front.

Anti-Semitism and the Holocaust

Anti-Semitism and the Holocaust

Author: Beth A. Griech-Polelle

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350158634

Category: History

Page: 329

View: 791

Appreciating the power of language, and how discriminatory words can have deadly consequences, is pivotal to our understanding of the Holocaust. Engaging with a wealth of primary sources and significant Holocaust scholarship, Anti-Semitism and the Holocaust traces the historical tradition of anti-Semitism to explore this in detail. From religious anti-Semitism in ancient Rome to racially-led anti-Semites focused on building superior nation-states in 19th-century Europe to Hitler's vitriolic attacks, Griech-Polelle analyzes how tropes and stereotypes incited suspicion, dislike and hatred of the Jews – and, ultimately, how this was used to drive anti-Semitic feeling toward genocide. Crucially, this 2nd edition sheds further light on the everyday experience of ordinary Germans and Jews under the Nazi regime, with new chapters examining the role of the Christian Churches in Hitler's persecution of the Jews and those who participated in rescue work and resistance more broadly. With new illustrations, a detailed glossary and up-to-date further reading suggestions and questions, this 2nd edition provides a concise and lucid survey of European Jewry, the Holocaust, and the language of anti-Semitism.

Turncoats & True Believers

Turncoats & True Believers

Author: Ted George Goertzel

Publisher: Promtheus

ISBN: UCAL:B4377035

Category: Philosophy

Page: 476

View: 832

Provides portraits of individuals from different fields and examines the nature of their beliefs, including such figures as Abbie Hoffman and Saddam Hussein

In the Shadow of the Holocaust

In the Shadow of the Holocaust

Author: James F. Tent

Publisher: Modern War Studies (Hardcover)

ISBN: UOM:39015056660783

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 879

"James Tent recounts how these men and women from all over Germany and from all walks of life struggled to survive in an increasingly hostile society, even as their Jewish relatives were disappearing into the East. It draws on extensive interviews with twenty survivors, many of whom were teenagers when Hitler came to power, to show how "half-Jews" coped with conditions on a day-to-day basis, and how the legacy of the hatred they suffered still lingers in their minds."

Nazi Party and the Occultism

Nazi Party and the Occultism

Author: Davis Truman

Publisher: Vincenzo Nappi

ISBN: 9798215798898

Category: History

Page: 0

View: 279

Occult figures undoubtedly played a significant role in the formation of the NSDAP, but it is equally obvious that leading Nazis later denounced and persecuted occult groups. Occult "true believers" in the party ranks were frequently marginalized and persecuted as the Nazi Party gained prominence and power after 1919. In any case, a surprising number of people in the Third Reich were open to occult beliefs and practices, including senior figures like Hitler and Heinrich Himmler, the head of the SS and Gestapo. Without a widespread propensity for paranormal thinking, which Hitler and the Nazi Party rushed to capitalize on and was exacerbated by military defeat and social crisis, the Third Reich would have been highly improbable. The National Socialist movement was not the first to use religious sentiment for political gain. However, Hitler's NSDAP was far more successful than other parties in appealing to a generation traumatized by war, violence, and sociopolitical upheaval by appealing to a supernatural imagination.

From the 1400s

From the 1400s

Author: Chris Perry

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin College Division

ISBN: 0618271031

Category: History

Page: 706

View: 581

This survey text presents the Western intellectual tradition within a chronology of political history. Known for its accessible writing style, Western Civilization appeals to students and instructors alike for its brevity, clarity, and careful selection of content. New technology resources, including Houghton Mifflin's Eduspace course management system, make learning more engaging and instruction more efficient.In the Eighth Edition, several new pedagogical features support students throughout the term. Chapter-opening focus questions direct students to important themes, while a glossary reinforces key terms and concepts. New icons in the text direct students to online resources such as maps, primary sources, and practice test questions. In addition, the new edition retains many popular features, including comparative timelines, full-color maps with physical geography essays, and primary source excerpts.

The Killing Game

The Killing Game

Author: Mark Bourrie

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 9781443447034

Category: Political Science

Page: 304

View: 258

On January 21, 2015, a pro-ISIS Twitter account reported that John Maguire, a 23-year-old university drop-out from the Ottawa Valley town of Kemptville, had been killed fighting Kurds in the Syrian city of Kobani. A few weeks before, Maguire had starred in a YouTube video threatening Canada for bombing ISIS forces in Iraq. He is one of the dozens of young Canadians who have chosen to fight in a vicious conflict that really had little to do with them and with Canada. Why would young people choose to fight in other people's wars, especially one as bloody and cruel as this one? Why has ISIS become so good at attracting foreign fighters? This book examines the lure of this radical Islamist movement: its religious beliefs, sophisticated propaganda, and vast social media networks. ISIS is now a go-to cause for alienated young people in the Islamic World and the West. Does it offer answers to troubled young people? Are ISIS's crimes -- slavery, murder, rape, repression, and the destruction of heritage sites -- an attraction in and of themselves? What do we do about the people who take up ISIS's cause but stay in their home country? What do we do with the ISIS recruits who come home? The Killing Game examines what draws young men and women to join violent social/political movements. It looks at the psychology of young men and women today and the propaganda used by all sides in the Middle East conflicts, as well as the security laws and the political initiatives that have been designed to stop Canadians from being radicalized. From the irresistible lure of Marxist-Leninism of the 1930s through the ’60s and ’70s, and including the appeal of Nazism to young Germans in the 1930s, this book also investigates what it is that draws young people to join and fight for causes as different as the Spanish Civil War of the 1930s and the Red Brigades of the 1970s, but with an emphasis on the attraction of ISIS and radical Islam in our own time.

Antisemitic Myths

Antisemitic Myths

Author: Marvin Perry

Publisher:

ISBN: MINN:31951D02815153Z

Category: History

Page: 388

View: 175

The current revival of antisemitism in Europe and the demonization of Jews in parts of the Muslim world give special importance to the exposure of the myths and lies that for centuries led people to regard Jews as the dangerous ""other"" and that led to violence and persecution. This provocative anthology presents 90 documents that focus on the nature, evolution, and meaning of the principal myths that have made antisemitism such a lethal force in history: Jews as deicides, ritual murderers, agents of Satan, international conspirators, and conniving, unscrupulous Shylocks. Also included are documents illustrating the recent revival of classical myths about Jews among black nationalists, Holocaust deniers, and Islamic fundamentalists.