Why the French Love Jerry Lewis

Why the French Love Jerry Lewis

Author: Rae Beth Gordon

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 0804738947

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 300

View: 337

Vividly bringing to light the tradition of physical comedy in the French cabaret, cafe-concert, and early French film comedy, this book answers the perplexing question, "Why do the French love Jerry Lewis?" It shows how Lewis touches a nerve in the French cultural memory because, more than any other film comic, he incarnates a distinctively French tradition of performance style."

Jerry Lewis

Jerry Lewis

Author: Chris Fujiwara

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252091346

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 176

View: 552

Well known for his slapstick comedic style, Jerry Lewis has also delighted worldwide movie audiences with a directing career spanning five decades. One of American cinema's great innovators, Lewis made unmistakably personal films that often focused on an ideal masculine image and an anarchic, manic acting out of the inability to assume this image. Films such as The Bellboy, The Errand Boy, Three on a Couch, and The Big Mouth present a series of thematic variations on this tension, in which such questions as how to be a man, how to be popular, and how to maintain relationships are posed within frameworks that set up a liberating and exhilarating confusion of roles and norms. The Nutty Professor and The Patsy are especially profound and painful examinations of the difficulty experienced by Lewis's character in reconciling loving himself and being loved by others. With sharp, concise observations, Chris Fujiwara examines this visionary director of self-referential comedic masterpieces. The book also includes an enlightening interview with Lewis that offers unique commentary on the creation and study of comedy.

Side By Side: Dean Martin & Jerry Lewis On TV and Radio

Side By Side: Dean Martin & Jerry Lewis On TV and Radio

Author: Michael J. Hayde

Publisher: BearManor Media

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page:

View: 474

“A treasure trove for any fan of Dean and Jerry, packed with valuable information, behind-the-scenes stories, and a dizzying array of rare photos. I couldn’t put this book down!” – Leonard Maltin Michael J. Hayde is the author of My Name’s Friday: The Unauthorized But True Story of Dragnet and the Films of Jack Webb, Chaplin’s Vintage Year: The History of the Mutual-Chaplin Specials and Flights of Fantasy: The Unauthorized but True Story of Radio & TV’s Adventures of Superman.

Larger Than Life

Larger Than Life

Author: R. Barton Palmer

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813547664

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 295

View: 424

A Volume in the Star Decades: American Culture/American Cinema series, edited by Adrienne L. McLean and Murray Pomerance --Book Jacket.

Art in Consumer Culture

Art in Consumer Culture

Author: Grace McQuilten

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409422402

Category: Art

Page: 224

View: 813

A call to arms for creative freedom and critical thought, Art in Consumer Culture: Mis-Design asks the contemporary art world to be honest about the pervasive effects of commodification and the difficulty of staging critique. The book examines the collusion of art and design in the work of Murakami, Zittel, Kalkin, and Acconci, in order to find avenues of critique in a commercially driven cultural landscape.

Telethons

Telethons

Author: Paul K. Longmore

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190262099

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 255

Movie stars, entertainers, game-show hosts, jugglers, plate-spinners, gospel choirs, corporate executives posing with over-sized checks, household name-brand products, smiling children in leg braces-all were fixtures of the phenomenon that defined American culture in the second half of the twentieth century: the telethon. Hundreds of millions watched these weekend-long variety shows that raised billions of dollars for disability-related charities. Drawing on over two decades of in-depth research, Telethons trenchantly explores the complexity underneath the campy spectacles. At its center are the disabled children, who, thanks to a particular kind of historical-cultural marginalization, turned out to be ideal tools for promoting corporate interests, privatized healthcare, and class status. Offering a public message about helping these unfortunate victims, telethons perpetuated a misleading image of people with disabilities as helpless, passive, apolitical members of American society. Paul K. Longmore's revelatory chronicle shows how these images in fact helped major corporations increase their bottom lines, while filling gaps in the strange public-private hybrid U.S. health insurance system. Only once disabled people pushed back in public protests did the broader implications for all Americans become clear. Mining insights from great thinkers such as Adam Smith, Edmund Burke, and Alexis de Tocqueville, along with contemporary cultural figures like Jerry Lewis, Ralph Nader, and several disability rights activists, Telethons offers a provocative meditation on big business, American government, popular culture, Cold War values, and "activism" both narrowly and broadly defined. As highly popular entertainment, telethons schooled Americans about how to feel about their bodies, fitness, health, and appropriate ways to interact with people whose bodies did not fit norms determined by advertisers. The programs also taught them about when to weep and how to cure guilt through "conspicuous contribution." Longmore's astute observations about psychology, economics, and society reveal how writing off telethons as kitsch and irrelevant has enabled many individual attitudes, corporate practices, and government policies to go unquestioned. Ultimately, Telethons reveals the passion, humanity, resistance, and triumph that were not center-stage on these popular telecasts by offering insights into the U.S. disability movement past and present.

Funny How?

Funny How?

Author: Alex Clayton

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438478296

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 162

View: 270

What makes something funny? This book shows how humor can be analyzed without killing the joke. Alex Clayton argues that the brevity of a sketch or skit and its typical rejection of narrative development make it comedy-concentrate, providing a rich field for exploring how humor works. Focusing on a dozen or so skits and scenes, Clayton shows precisely how sketch comedy appeals to the funny bone and engages our philosophical imagination. He suggests that since humor is about persuading an audience to laugh, it can be understood as a form of rhetoric. Through vivid, highly readable analyses of individual sketches, Clayton illustrates that Aristotle's three forms of appeal—logos, the appeal to reason; ethos, the appeal to communality; and pathos, the appeal to emotion—can form the basis for illuminating the inner workings of humor. Drawing on both popular and lesser-known examples from the United States, United Kingdom, and elsewhere—Monty Python's Flying Circus, Key and Peele, Saturday Night Live, Airplane!, and Smack the Pony—Clayton reveals the techniques and resonances of humor.

Steven Spielberg

Steven Spielberg

Author: Steven Spielberg

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 157806113X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 300

View: 652

Reveals the ambitious drive of the movie producer and director, including his continuous fear of failure and need for approval, and discusses the themes and issues addressed in his films.