Planning After Petroleum

Planning After Petroleum

Author: Jago Dodson

Publisher:

ISBN: 0415504589

Category: Architecture

Page: 208

View: 845

The past decade has been one of the most volatile periods in global petroleum markets in living memory, and future oil supply security and price levels remain highly uncertain. This poses many questions for the professional activities of planners and urbanists because contemporary cities are highly dependent on petroleum as a transport fuel. How will oil dependent cities respond, and adapt to, the changing pattern of petroleum supplies? What key strategies should planners and policy makers implement in petroleum vulnerable cities to address the challenges of moving beyond oil? How might a shift away from petroleum provide opportunities to improve or remake cities for the economic, social and environmental imperatives of twenty-first-century sustainability? Such questions are the focus of contributors to this book with perspectives ranging across the planning challenge: overarching petroleum futures, governance, transition and climate change questions, the role of various urban transport nodes and household responses, ways of measuring oil vulnerability, and the effects on telecommunications, ports and other urban infrastructure. This comprehensive volume with contributions from and focusing on cities in Australia, the UK, the US, France, Germany, the Netherlands and South Korea provides key insights to enable cities to plan for the age beyond petroleum. "

Planning After Petroleum

Planning After Petroleum

Author: Jago Dodson

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781317307846

Category: Architecture

Page: 250

View: 577

The past decade has been one of the most volatile periods in global petroleum markets in living memory, and future oil supply security and price levels remain highly uncertain. This poses many questions for the professional activities of planners and urbanists because contemporary cities are highly dependent on petroleum as a transport fuel. How will oil dependent cities respond, and adapt to, the changing pattern of petroleum supplies? What key strategies should planners and policy makers implement in petroleum vulnerable cities to address the challenges of moving beyond oil? How might a shift away from petroleum provide opportunities to improve or remake cities for the economic, social and environmental imperatives of twenty-first-century sustainability? Such questions are the focus of contributors to this book with perspectives ranging across the planning challenge: overarching petroleum futures, governance, transition and climate change questions, the role of various urban transport nodes and household responses, ways of measuring oil vulnerability, and the effects on telecommunications, ports and other urban infrastructure. This comprehensive volume – with contributions from and focusing on cities in Australia, the UK, the US, France, Germany, the Netherlands and South Korea – provides key insights to enable cities to plan for the age beyond petroleum.

The Ebb and Flow of Chinese Petroleum

The Ebb and Flow of Chinese Petroleum

Author: Mao Huahe

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004402737

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 383

View: 105

In The Ebb and Flow of Chinese Petroleum, the author Huahe Mao breaks with the official government narrative concerning the Chinese petroleum industry and provides the true story as he personally experienced it.

Bicycles in American Highway Planning

Bicycles in American Highway Planning

Author: Bruce D. Epperson

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786494958

Category: Transportation

Page: 248

View: 765

The United States differs from other developed nations in the extent to which its national bicycle transportation policy relies on the use of unmodified roadways, with cyclists obeying the same traffic regulations as motor vehicles. This policy--known as "vehicular cycling"--evolved between 1969, when the "10-speed boom" saw a sharp increase in adult bicycling, and 1991, when the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials adopted an official policy that on-road bikeways were not desirable. This policy resulted from a growing realization by highway engineers and experienced club cyclists that they had parallel interests: the cyclists preferred to ride on highways, because most bikeways were not designed for high speeds and pack riding; and the highway engineers did not want to divert funding from roadways to construct bikeways. Using contemporary magazine articles, government reports, and archival material from industry lobbying groups and national cycling organizations, this book tells the story of how America became a nation of bicyclists without bikeways.