Sweeney Astray

Sweeney Astray

Author: Seamus Heaney

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 9781466855809

Category: Poetry

Page: 96

View: 778

Sweeney Astray is Seamus Heaney's version of the medieval Irish work Buile Suibne. Its hero, Mad Sweeney, undergoes a series of purgatorial adventures after he is cursed by a saint and turned into a bird at the Battle of Moira. Heaney's translation not only restores to us a work of historical and literary importance but offers the genius of one of our greatest living poets to reinforce its claims on the reader of contemporary literature.

Seamus Heaney and Medieval Poetry

Seamus Heaney and Medieval Poetry

Author: Conor McCarthy

Publisher: DS Brewer

ISBN: 184384141X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 195

View: 106

First examination of the use made by Seamus Heaney of medieval poetry in his translations and adaptations, including the acclaimed Beowulf.

Poetry in Contemporary Irish Literature

Poetry in Contemporary Irish Literature

Author: Michael Kenneally

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 086140310X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 494

View: 611

This is the second of four collections of essays published under the general title Studies in Contemporary Irish Literature which are devoted to critical analysis of Irish writing since the 1950s. Essays in this collection establish some of the defining characteristics of contemporary Irish poetry, examine common features of several groups of poets and present focused analyses of twelve individual poets. The contributors are Elmer Andrews, Rand Brandes, Rory Brennan, Terence Brown, Richard Allen Cave, Tom Clyde, Gerald Dawe, Peter Denman, Maurice Elliott, Eamon Grennan, Edna Longley, Caoimhin MacGiolla Leith, Kathleen McCracken, Peter McDonald, Ron Marken, Gerardine Meaney, Dennis O'Driscoll, Bernard O' Donoghuem Alan Peacock, Linda Revie, Robert Tracy, Stan Smith and Clair Wills.

Medieval and Modern Ireland

Medieval and Modern Ireland

Author: Canadian Association for Irish Studies. International Conference

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0389207934

Category: History

Page: 158

View: 773

Readers of this volume will be struck by the pervasiveness of the connections between the medieval and the modern in Ireland and the Irish, artists in particular, and realize why James Joyce could hardly avoid linking the modern Irish artist with the medieval Irish monk, as he does in the bitter musings of Stephen Dedalus, who walks alone into eternity along Sandymount Strand: "You were going to do wonders, what? Missionary to Europe after fiery Columbanus." Contents: Introduction, Richard Wall; The Image Of The IrishóMedieval and ModernóContinuity and Change, F.X. Martin, O.S.A.; John Bull's Other Ego: Reactions to the Stage Irishman in Anglo-Irish Drama, Heinz Kosok; Contemporary Irish Poetry and The Matter of IrelandóThomas Kinsella, John Montague and Seamus Heaney, Brian John; Early Irish Literature and Contemporary Scholarly Disciplines, Ann Dooley; Brian Friel's Translations: National and Universal Dimensions, Wolfgang Zach; Brian Moore and The Meaning of Exile, Hallvard Dahlie; Medieval Irish Poetics: Linguistic Interaction and Audience, Toni O'Brien Johnson; The Artifice of Eternity: Medieval Aspects of Modern Irish Literature, John Wilson Foster; Notes; Notes on Contributors; Index^R

The Popular & the Canonical

The Popular & the Canonical

Author: David Johnson

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415351693

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 468

View: 817

This volume ranges from the Second World War to the postmodern, considering issues of the 'popular' and the competing criteria by which literature has been judged in the later twentieth century. As well as tracing the transition from modernism to postmodernism, the authors guide students through debates around the pleasures of the popular and the question of inter-relations between 'mass' and 'high' cultures. Drawing further upon issues of value and function raised in Aestheticism and Modernism: Debating Twentieth-Century Literature 1900-1960, they examine contemporary literary prizes and the activity of judgement involved in English Studies. This text can be used alongside the other books in the series for a complete course on twentieth-century literature, or on its own as essential reading for students of mid to late twentieth-century writing. Texts examined in detail include: du Maurier's Rebecca, poetry by Ginsburg and O'Hara, Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, Puig's Kiss of the Spiderwoman, Beckett's Waiting for Godot, Heaney's New Selected Poems 1966-1987, Gurnah's Paradise, Barker's The Ghost Road.

Poetry, Publishing, and Visual Culture from Late Modernism to the Twenty-first Century

Poetry, Publishing, and Visual Culture from Late Modernism to the Twenty-first Century

Author: Natalie Pollard

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192593979

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 331

View: 460

This is a book about contemporary literary and artistic entanglements: word and image, media and materiality, inscription and illustration. It proposes a vulnerable, fugitive mode of reading poetry, which defies disciplinary categorisations, embracing the open-endedness and provisionality of forms. This manifests itself interactively in the six case studies, which have been chosen for their distinctness and diversity across the long twentieth century: the book begins with the early twentieth-century work of writer and artist Djuna Barnes, exploring her re-animation of sculptural and dramatic sources. It then turns to the late modernist artist and poet David Jones considering his use of the graphic and plastic arts in The Anathemata, and next, to the underappreciated mid-century poet F.T. Prince, whose work uncannily re-activates Michelangelo's poetry and sculpture. The second half of the book explores the collaborations of the canonical poet Ted Hughes with the publisher and artist Leonard Baskin during the 1970s; the innovative late twentieth-century poetry of Denise Riley who uses page space and embodied sound as a form of address; and, finally, the contemporary poet Paul Muldoon who has collaborated with photographers and artists, as well as ventriloquising nonhuman phenomena. The resulting unique study offers contemporary writers and readers a new understanding of literary, artistic, and nonhuman practices and shows the cultural importance of engaging with their messy co-dependencies. The book challenges critical methodologies that make a sharp division between the textual work and the extra-literary, and raises urgent questions about the status and autonomy of art and its social role.

Acting Between the Lines

Acting Between the Lines

Author: Marilynn J. Richtarik

Publisher: CUA Press

ISBN: 0813210755

Category: History

Page: 356

View: 533

Acting Between the Lines is the first full-length study of Northern Ireland's Field Day Theatre Company.

Emerald Green

Emerald Green

Author: Tim Wenzell

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443818001

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 175

View: 387

Emerald Green: An Ecocritical Study of Irish Literature analyzes a wide range of Irish literature whose themes tie into a reverence for the natural world of Ireland. From an ecocritical perspective, these works, tied into an understanding of the landscape and particular aspects of nature, attain a fresh new meaning and foster a more relevant reflection of Ireland’s beautiful literary landscape. The analysis begins with the first Irish writers, the hermit poets, and examines the ways in which the Irish hermit and saint were connected spiritually, through both pagan and early Christian values, to the natural world. The book then examines Irish literature from the perspective of the deforested landscape and the landscapes of farmland, divided property, famine, ruins, and a threatening natural world. Following the Famine, the book moves on to explore the establishment of the pastoral dream in this loss of landscape, and a re- connection to nature through the writers of the Irish Literary Renaissance. From there, the analysis shifts to the nature writing of Ireland’s islands, including nature and community on Achill Island, storytelling on the Aran Islands, exile in nature on Skellig Michael, and the mythmaking of the Great Blasket Island. Moving north and into the twentieth century, Emerald Green focuses on four nature poets from Northern Ireland: Patrick Kavanagh, Louis MacNeice, Seamus Heaney, and Michael Longley; all four are redeemed by nature through their returns to the rural landscape of Ireland’s west coast. The book concludes with an examination of modern Irish environmental writers and naturalist poets, as well as journalists weighing in on current environmental concerns in Ireland. Emerald Green concludes with an assessment of the future of nature in Ireland, and how the significant reduction of this country’s natural landscape will alter its literary landscape as well.

In Gratitude for All the Gifts

In Gratitude for All the Gifts

Author: Magdalena Kay

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781442644984

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 249

View: 691

In Gratitude for All the Gifts explores the literary and cultural links between the bestselling, Nobel Prize-winning Northern Irish poet Seamus Heaney and the preeminent Eastern European poets of the twentieth century, including fellow Nobel laureate Czeslaw Milosz and Zbigniew Herbert. Magdalena Kay opens new ground in comparative literary studies with her close analysis of Heaney's poetic work from the perspective of the English-speaking West's attraction, and especially Heane''s own attraction, to Eastern European poetry. While placing Milosz and Herbert in their cultural contexts and keeping an eye on the poems in their original Polish, this innovative and energetic study focuses on how Heaney encountered their work in translation. In Gratitude for All the Gifts thus allows us to see what happens when poetic forms, histories, and themes travel between countries and encourages us to understand cultural crossing not just thematically, but also in terms of form, voice, and aesthetic intent.

Literature & Place, 1800-2000

Literature & Place, 1800-2000

Author: Peter Brown

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 3039115707

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 650

Ten original essays examine the transactions between real places and the literary imagination, including the reinvention of real places in literary form, from 1800 to the present day. They deal with different kinds of locations (islands, countries, cities), the topoi writers use to articulate a sense of place (maps, ruins, landscape, history), their generic manifestations in fiction, travel writing, topography, (auto)biography and poetry, and the theoretical and methodological issues which arise. The focus moves outwards from local to regional and national issues, covering questions of cultural identity, space, representation, historicity, and modernity in England, Scotland, Ireland, France, Germany, the United States, and the South Pacific. The contributors are drawn from both sides of the Atlantic, and include established scholars as well as newer voices.

Seamus Heaney and the Language Of Poetry

Seamus Heaney and the Language Of Poetry

Author: Bernard O'Donoghue

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315504872

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 186

View: 944

This book scrutinizes Heaney's language in order to examine his theory of poetry and the writer's responsibility to art and politics. The author, himself a poet, works chronologically through the poetry and discusses it in light of Heaney's writings on the appropriate language of poetry. Chapters also look at Heaney's language and at the government of the tongue.