The Death of Amy Robsart

The Death of Amy Robsart

Author: Sarah-Beth Watkins

Publisher: John Hunt Publishing

ISBN: 9781789044836

Category: History

Page: 80

View: 672

Amy Robsart was the wife of Queen Elizabeth I's favourite, Robert Dudley, later Earl of Leicester. In September 1560, she was found dead, her neck broken, at the bottom of a flight of stairs at Cumnor Place. Amy was twenty-eight when she died and her marriage to Dudley had been one of great absences and loneliness. Some said she was ill, others that she was desperate. More sinister rumours talked of murder. In this book we look at Amy's unsolved death and examine who had motive to commit such a dark deed. Was it an accident, suicide or murder? The Death of Amy Robsart is the first volume in an exciting new historical true crime series from Chronos Books.

Amy Robsart

Amy Robsart

Author: Christine Hartweg

Publisher: Christine Hartweg

ISBN: 9781548783600

Category: History

Page: 156

View: 377

Amy Robsart, the wife of Queen Elizabeth's favourite Robert Dudley, was found dead at the foot of some stairs at Cumnor, Oxfordshire, on 8 September 1560. Did she fall and break her neck, as the coroner's jury concluded? Was she ill? Did she jump? Was she pushed? Was she murdered, as many people suspected – at the time and since – and who were the killers? This vivid biography recounts her life and death in the shadow of the Tudor court, using all available documents, some for the first time. There will also for the first time be an in-depth look at the people around her, like her half-brothers, her host, or her supposed killer. The possible causes of her death, accident, suicide, murder, even illness, are discussed in context of the surviving evidence, modern statistics, and Renaissance culture. While there will never be a definite answer to the mystery of Amy's death, her life can be rescued from the myths that have grown around her over the centuries.

Chronos Crime Chronicles - the Death of Amy Robsart

Chronos Crime Chronicles - the Death of Amy Robsart

Author: Sarah-Beth Watkins

Publisher: Chronos Books

ISBN: 1789044820

Category: History

Page: 80

View: 637

In September 1560, Amy Robsart, wife of Queen Elizabeth I's favourite, Robert Dudley, was found dead at the bottom of a flight of stairs, at the age of twenty-eight. Sinister rumours ensued. Was it an accident, suicide or murder?

Death and the Virgin

Death and the Virgin

Author: Chris Skidmore

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9780297857761

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 393

The dramatic story of Elizabeth's first ten years on the throne and the unexplained death that scandalised her court. Elizabeth came to the throne in 1558 a 25-year-old virgin - the most prized catch in Christendom. For the first ten years of her reign, one matter dominated above all others: the question of who the queen was to marry and when she would produce an heir. Elizabeth's life as England's Virgin Queen is one of the most celebrated in history. Christopher Skidmore takes a fresh look at the familiar story of a queen with the stomach of a man, steadfastly refusing to marry for the sake of her realm, and reveals a very different picture: of a vulnerable young woman, in love with her suitor, Robert Dudley. Had it not been for the mysterious and untimely death of his wife, Amy Robsart, Elizabeth might have one day been able to marry Dudley, since Amy was believed to be dying of breast cancer. Instead, the suspicious circumstances surrounding Amy Robsart's death would cast a long shadow over Elizabeth's life, preventing any hope of a union with Dudley and ultimately shaping the course of Tudor history. Using newly discovered evidence from the archives, Christopher Skidmore is able to put an end to centuries of speculation as to the true causes of her death.

Power and Politics in Tudor England

Power and Politics in Tudor England

Author: G.W. Bernard

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351909525

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 257

Characterised by an interest in the nature and expression of power, this collection of essays by George Bernard combines a number of previously published pieces with original studies. Chapters range from detailed studies of aspects of the political and religious history of the reign of Henry VIII to more general accounts of early-modern architecture, the development of the Church of England, and a polemical attack upon 'postmodern' historiography. The role of the nobility is a major theme. Emphasis is given to their social, economic, political and ideological power and the ways in which they exercised it in support of the monarchy. In-depth examinations of the falls of Anne Boleyn and Cardinal Wolsey and the relationship of the King and ministers challenge widespread views concerning the significance of factionalism. Analyses of such key events indicate that Henry VIII was very much in charge. Likely to provoke considerable debate, this stimulating collection is an important contribution to Tudor history.