The Knowing of Thomas James

The Knowing of Thomas James

Author: Alan James

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 9781465358806

Category: Fiction

Page: 462

View: 277

The Knowing of Thomas James In May of 1906 a telegram was delivered to the Methodist Manse, home of the Reverend Thomas Albert James, in Albany on the Southern tip of Western Australia. Mr James has been accidentally drowned. Body not recovered. Particulars posted today. Deep regret. Robert Hunter. These few words were to alter forever the lives of the James family. They were to unleash such a scandal that Thomas’s family fled the town in shame and his church ex communicated him. The true story behind these events ran in newspapers across the country throughout 1906. This truth was deliberately buried by Mrs James and the family; a taboo not to be mentioned; a mystery that remained hidden from successive generations for nearly a century. The Reverend Thomas James was no ordinary rural parson. He had risen to the pinnacle of leadership of the church in Western Australia but was a controversial character at loggerheads with the hierarchy of his church. In the aftermath of the events of 1906, the church records too were embargoed until the year 2000 such was the magnitude of his indiscretion. In 1906 Thomas James disappeared in circumstances that scandalized the church and shocked the family and society to the core. None of thirteen grandchildren ever knew their grandfather. All were denied the truth until this story was written. The Knowing of Thomas James has come as a revelation to his descendants. For one branch of the family knew who he had been but knew nothing of what became him and another branch of the family had absolutely no knowing of their grandfather at all. The impact and implications of this story are being felt to this day. The story was written as the result of more than two decades of research. It was a story that needed to be told for the sake of the families. It was told to honour a promise made to one of Thomas James’s grandchildren. A promise to my own father for Thomas Albert James is my great-grandfather. Essentially this is a family history and that was its design, however, it was my opinion that many family histories have limited appeal to any but those connected. It was always my intention to take the factual bones of research and imbue them with the flesh and blood of feelings and emotions. I have tried to enter the hearts and minds of the many characters touched by these tumultuous events in a story that has appeal to all. Each of the characters in this drama is introduced as the family moves across the years toward the fateful point in time when the shocking events unfold. For the family, the facts are presented in detail for all to find. I make no apology for the creative licence taken in interpreting these events and attributing motives to those involved in this story. I have created my own explanation of the actual events portrayed in a way that I hope is attractive for readers who have no personal connection to this story. I have liberally included actual material as and when I felt it appropriate to do so with the generous support of the newspapers of the day. This is a fiction built on the truth of a very real story. Were this story to be played out today it would surely make the headlines and be fed upon by our salacious modern media. However these events were set in a time long passed, in the strict moral world of Victorian Australia at the opening of the twentieth century. My great grandmother and her children sought refuge from the humiliation of these events by moving to a farm on the beautiful Kalgan River twenty miles east of Albany. My grandfather and then my father, in his turn, farmed this property. Today my brother is the farmer and I too live on the property within sight of the original farmhouse and of the river. I am by profession a teacher of History and have worked for more than twenty five years at the main High School in Albany. I knew nothing of the story until 1988 when I encountered reference to Thomas James in the history of his sister’s family. Not

The Knowing of Thomas James

The Knowing of Thomas James

Author: Alan James

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1465358668

Category: Fiction

Page: 464

View: 708

The Knowing of Thomas James In May of 1906 a telegram was delivered to the Methodist Manse, home of the Reverend Thomas Albert James, in Albany on the Southern tip of Western Australia. Mr James has been accidentally drowned. Body not recovered. Particulars posted today. Deep regret. Robert Hunter. These few words were to alter forever the lives of the James family. They were to unleash such a scandal that Thomas's family fled the town in shame and his church ex communicated him. The true story behind these events ran in newspapers across the country throughout 1906. This truth was deliberately buried by Mrs James and the family; a taboo not to be mentioned; a mystery that remained hidden from successive generations for nearly a century. The Reverend Thomas James was no ordinary rural parson. He had risen to the pinnacle of leadership of the church in Western Australia but was a controversial character at loggerheads with the hierarchy of his church. In the aftermath of the events of 1906, the church records too were embargoed until the year 2000 such was the magnitude of his indiscretion. In 1906 Thomas James disappeared in circumstances that scandalized the church and shocked the family and society to the core. None of thirteen grandchildren ever knew their grandfather. All were denied the truth until this story was written. The Knowing of Thomas James has come as a revelation to his descendants. For one branch of the family knew who he had been but knew nothing of what became him and another branch of the family had absolutely no knowing of their grandfather at all. The impact and implications of this story are being felt to this day. The story was written as the result of more than two decades of research. It was a story that needed to be told for the sake of the families. It was told to honour a promise made to one of Thomas James's grandchildren. A promise to my own father for Thomas Albert James is my great-grandfather. Essentially this is a family history and that was its design, however, it was my opinion that many family histories have limited appeal to any but those connected. It was always my intention to take the factual bones of research and imbue them with the flesh and blood of feelings and emotions. I have tried to enter the hearts and minds of the many characters touched by these tumultuous events in a story that has appeal to all. Each of the characters in this drama is introduced as the family moves across the years toward the fateful point in time when the shocking events unfold. For the family, the facts are presented in detail for all to find. I make no apology for the creative licence taken in interpreting these events and attributing motives to those involved in this story. I have created my own explanation of the actual events portrayed in a way that I hope is attractive for readers who have no personal connection to this story. I have liberally included actual material as and when I felt it appropriate to do so with the generous support of the newspapers of the day. This is a fiction built on the truth of a very real story. Were this story to be played out today it would surely make the headlines and be fed upon by our salacious modern media. However these events were set in a time long passed, in the strict moral world of Victorian Australia at the opening of the twentieth century. My great grandmother and her children sought refuge from the humiliation of these events by moving to a farm on the beautiful Kalgan River twenty miles east of Albany. My grandfather and then my father, in his turn, farmed this property. Today my brother is the farmer and I too live on the property within sight of the original farmhouse and of the river. I am by profession a teacher of History and have worked for more than twenty five years at the main High School in Albany. I knew nothing of the story until 1988 when I encountered reference to Thomas James in the history of his sister's family. Not

Knowing Dickens

Knowing Dickens

Author: Rosemarie Bodenheimer

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801467011

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 672

"A revealing and concealing intelligence lurks somewhere—but where, exactly?—in Dickens's writing. To capture something of that knowing Dickens who eludes us, I follow some representative clusters of thought and feeling that link Dickens's ways of talking in letters with his concerns in fiction and journalism. What are the internal plots this writer carried around throughout his life, his characteristic patterns of experience, response, and counterresponse? What shapes recur in the various forms of writing and acting that make up this life?"—from Knowing Dickens In this compelling and accessible book Rosemarie Bodenheimer explores the thoughtworld of the Victorian novelist who was most deeply intrigued by nineteenth-century ideas about the unconscious mind. Dickens found many ways to dramatize in his characters both unconscious processes and acts of self-projection—notions that are sometimes applied to him as if he were an unwitting patient. Bodenheimer explains how the novelist used such techniques to negotiate the ground between knowing and telling, revealing and concealing. She asks how well Dickens knew himself—the extent to which he understood his own nature and the ways he projected himself in his fictions—and how well we can know him. Knowing Dickens is the first book to systematically explore Dickens's abundant correspondence in relation to his published writings. Gathering evidence from letters, journalistic essays, stories, and novels that bear on a major issue or pattern of response in Dickens's life and work, Bodenheimer cuts across familiar storylines in Dickens biography and criticism in chapters that take up topics including self-defensive language, models of memory, relations of identification and rivalry among men, houses and household management, and walking and writing.

To My Beloved Wife and Boy at Home

To My Beloved Wife and Boy at Home

Author: John F. L. Hartwell

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN: 0838636756

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 428

View: 618

John Hartwell, a 31-year-old married house carpenter from Herkimer, New York, enlisted in the Union Army on 23 August 1862, over his wife's objections. For the next two and one-half years, Hartwell filled six diaries and one hundred one letters describing his journey through hell. In 1989, Professor Ann Hartwell Britton discovered Hartwell's hoard of letters and five of the diaries among family papers in Florida and Massachusetts. Britton and her law faculty colleague Thomas J. Reed have, in this volume, copied, annotated, and edited Hartwell's letters and diaries for use by scholars of the Middle Period and by general readers interested in the common soldier's understanding of the War between the States. Hartwell lived through every major battle of the Army of the Potomac from Antietam to the Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court House and Second Cold Harbor. Since Hartwell was a draftsman as well as a builder, he carefully mapped his regiment's actions in some of those battles, as well as his winter quarters in 1863-64.