The Longman Companion to Victorian Fiction

The Longman Companion to Victorian Fiction

Author: John Sutherland

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: STANFORD:36105124163796

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 740

View: 871

"This work of reference on Victorian fiction captures the full range and depth of the Victorian novel. With over 900 biographical entries, more than 600 novels synopsied, and a wealth of background material on the publishers, reviewers, and readers of the age, the Longman Companion to Victorian Fiction is the fullest account of the period's fiction every published. Now in a second edition, the book has been revised and enlarged, and a generous selection of images have been included to illustrate various aspects of the Victorian publishing, writing, reviewing and reading worlds. In its totality, this is the most complete anatomy of this richest of literary fields currently available."--BOOK JACKET.

The Longman Companion to Victorian Fiction

The Longman Companion to Victorian Fiction

Author: John Sutherland

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317863335

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 736

View: 956

With over 900 biographical entries, more than 600 novels synopsized, and a wealth of background material on the publishers, reviewers and readers of the age the Longman Companion to Victorian Fiction is the fullest account of the period's fiction ever published. Now in a second edition, the book has been revised and a generous selection of images have been chosen to illustrate various aspects of Victorian publishing, writing, and reading life. Organised alphabetically, the information provided will be a boon to students, researchers and all lovers of reading. The entries, though concise, meet the high standards demanded by modern scholarship. The writing - marked by Sutherland's characteristic combination of flair, clarity and erudition - is of such a high standard that the book is a joy to read, as well as a definitive work of reference.

Victorian Fiction Beyond the Canon

Victorian Fiction Beyond the Canon

Author: Daragh Downes

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137518231

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 273

View: 800

This book is about selected Victorian texts and authors that in many cases have never before been subject to sustained scholarly attention. Taking inspiration from the pioneeringly capacious approach to the hidden hinterland of Victorian fiction adopted by scholars like John Sutherland and Franco Moretti, this energetically revisionist volume takes advantage of recent large-scale digitisation projects that allow unprecedented access to hitherto neglected literary texts and archives. Blending lively critical engagement with individual texts and close attention to often surprising trends in the production and reception of prose fiction across the Victorian era, this book will be of use to anyone interested in re-evaluating the received meta-narratives of Victorian literary history. With an afterword by John Sutherland

A Concise Companion to the Victorian Novel

A Concise Companion to the Victorian Novel

Author: Francis O'Gorman

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780470757550

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 379

This volume presents fresh approaches to classic Victorian fiction from 1830-1900. Opens up for the reader the cultural world in which the Victorian novel was written and read. Crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries. Provides fresh perspectives on how Victorian fiction relates to different contexts, such as class, sexuality, empire, psychology, law and biology.

A Companion to the Victorian Novel

A Companion to the Victorian Novel

Author: Patrick Brantlinger

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780470997208

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 528

View: 505

The Companion to the Victorian Novel provides contextual and critical information about the entire range of British fiction published between 1837 and 1901. Provides contextual and critical information about the entire range of British fiction published during the Victorian period. Explains issues such as Victorian religions, class structure, and Darwinism to those who are unfamiliar with them. Comprises original, accessible chapters written by renowned and emerging scholars in the field of Victorian studies. Ideal for students and researchers seeking up-to-the-minute coverage of contexts and trends, or as a starting point for a survey course.

Victorian Fiction

Victorian Fiction

Author: J. Sutherland

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230596344

Category: Fiction

Page: 198

View: 241

Drawing on extensive research, John Sutherland builds up a fascinating picture of the cultural, social and commercial factors influencing the content and production of Victorian fiction, discussing major writers such as Collins, Dickens, Eliot, Thackeray and Trollope alongside writers also very popular with the reading public - Reade, Lytton and Mrs Humphry Ward - but whose fame has not endured. Richly informative on the Victorian literary and cultural scene, this new reissue of John Sutherland's important 1995 study is essential reading for all those interested in the evolution of the Victorian novel, and includes a new Preface situating the book in current research being carried out on the history of the book and print culture.

Irish Novelists and the Victorian Age

Irish Novelists and the Victorian Age

Author: James H. Murphy

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191616594

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 320

View: 167

This is the first comprehensive study of the Irish writers of the Victorian age, some of them still remembered, most of them now forgotten. Their work was often directed to a British as well as an Irish reading audience and was therefore disparaged in the era of W.B. Yeats and the Irish Literary Revival with its culturally nationalist agenda. This study is based on a reading of around 370 novels by 150 authors, including still-familiar novelists such as William Carleton, the peasant writer who wielded much influence, and Charles Lever, whose serious work was destroyed by the slur of 'rollicking', as well as Joseph Sheridan LeFanu, George Moore, Emily Lawless, Somerville and Ross, Bram Stoker, and three of the leading authors from the new-woman movement, Sarah Grand, Iota, and George Egerton. James H. Murphy examines the work of these and many other writers in a variety of contexts: the political, economic, and cultural developments of the time; the vicissitudes of the reading audience; the realities of a publishing industry that was for the most part London-based; the often difficult circumstances of the lives of the novelists; and the ever changing genre of the novel itself, to which Irish authors often made a contribution. Politics, history, religion, gender and, particularly, land, over which nineteenth-century Ireland was deeply divided, featured as key themes for fiction. Finally, the book engages with the critical debate of recent times concerning the supposed failure of realism in the nineteenth-century Irish novel, looking for more specific causes than have hitherto been offered and discovering occasions on which realism turned out to be possible.

Victorian Fiction: Writers, Publishers, Readers

Victorian Fiction: Writers, Publishers, Readers

Author: John Sutherland

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781349239375

Category: History

Page: 191

View: 269

The proportion of Victorian novels in print today represents only a tiny fraction of what was published by this vast writing industry. Exact figures will never be known but we can estimate that around 50,000 works were produced by around 3,500 novelists during the Victorian era. But who wrote these novels and what inspired them to write? How were their novels published and how did they adapt their techniques to ensure the public's appetite for fiction was fed? Drawing on extensive research, John Sutherland builds up a fascinating picture of the cultural, social and commercial factors influencing the content and production of Victorian fiction. Collins, Dickens, Eliot, Thackeray and Trollope are discussed in tandem with writers also very popular with the reading public - Reade, Lytton and Mrs Humphry Ward - but whose fame has not endured. As John Sutherland demonstrates, author-publisher relations played a central role in determining the success of new novels, with some impressive achievements on both sides. Richly informative on the Victorian literary and cultural scene, this important study by one of our leading scholars is set to become essential reading for all those interested in the evolution of the Victorian novel.

A Companion to Sensation Fiction

A Companion to Sensation Fiction

Author: Pamela K. Gilbert

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444342215

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 680

View: 632

This comprehensive collection offers a complete introduction to one of the most popular literary forms of the Victorian period, its key authors and works, its major themes, and its lasting legacy. Places key authors and novels in their cultural and historical context Includes studies of major topics such as race, gender, melodrama, theatre, poetry, realism in fiction, and connections to other art forms Contributions from top international scholars approach an important literary genre from a range of perspectives Offers both a pre and post-history of the genre to situate it in the larger tradition of Victorian publishing and literature Incorporates coverage of traditional research and cutting-edge contemporary scholarship

Rereading Victorian Fiction

Rereading Victorian Fiction

Author: A. Jenkins

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230371149

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 218

View: 972

This book offers a collection of essays on novels and short stories from the beginning of Victoria's reign through to the end of the nineteenth century and into our own times. The essays represent a wide range of critical and theoretical viewpoints on fiction, and they deal with a number of lesser-known Victorian Works as well as with some of the most canonical texts of the period. The chronological range of the volume is extended by essays which explore Victorian texts' connections with earlier literature, as well as by studies of twentieth-century novelists' responses to Victorian fiction. Overall this collection emphasizes the breadth and diversity of Victorian prose fiction and will be of interest to students and specialists alike.

William Clark Russell and the Victorian Nautical Novel

William Clark Russell and the Victorian Nautical Novel

Author: Andrew Nash

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317320111

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 825

William Clark Russell wrote more than forty nautical novels. Immensely popular in their time, his works were admired by contemporary writers, such as Conan Doyle, Stevenson and Meredith, while Swinburne, considered him 'the greatest master of the sea, living or dead'. Based on extensive archival research, Nash explores this remarkable career.

The Detective's Companion in Crime Fiction

The Detective's Companion in Crime Fiction

Author: Lucy Andrew

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030749897

Category: Fiction

Page: 311

View: 566

This book aims to establish the position of the sidekick character in the crime and detective fiction literary genres. It re-evaluates the traditional view that the sidekick character in these genres is often overlooked as having a small, generic or singular role—either to act as the foil to the detective in order to accentuate their own abilities at solving crimes, or else to simply tell the story to the reader. Instead, essays in the collection explore the representations and functions of the detective’s sidekick across a range of forms and subgenres of crime fiction. By incorporating forms such as children’s detective fiction, comics and graphic novels and film and television alongside the more traditional fare of novels and short stories, this book aims to break down the boundaries that sometimes exist between these forms, using the sidekick as a defining thread to link them together into a wider conceptual argument that covers a broad range of crime narratives.